Faculty and Staff

Lu Hu

Lu Hu

Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry

Office: Chemistry 013A
Email: lu.hu@mso.umt.edu

Personal Website

Education

B.S.:   China University of Geosciences, Beijing

M.S.:  Institute of Geochemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences

Ph.D: University of Minnesota – Twin Cities

Postdoctoral: Harvard University

Research Interests

Hu group is hiring! Graduate assistantships are open for Fall 2018. Please email Prof. Hu if you are interested.

Lu Hu is an atmospheric chemist studying atmospheric composition and how it is influenced by human and natural processes. His research group uses a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to investigate the origins, chemistry, and transport of air pollutants such as ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM), and how they impact air quality and climate locally and globally. Current projects focus global tropospheric ozone budgets, long term changes of trace gases in the atmosphere, land-atmosphere exchange of organic carbon. Interested undergraduates or prospective graduate students please inquire about potential opportunities in his group. More information can be found at his group website at hs.umt.edu/luhu/.

Projects

Emission and chemistry of wildfires

Factors controlling global tropospheric ozone

Atmospheric chemistry in changing Arctic

Field of Study

Air quality and atmospheric chemistry; Biosphere-atmosphere interactions; Volatile organic compounds (VOCs); Ozone; Aerosol; Source attribution of air toxics; Chemical transport modeling at regional and global scales; Field observations; Mass spectrometry

Selected Publications

Hu, L., D.J. Jacob, X. Liu, Y. Zhang, L. Zhang, P.S. Kim, M.P. Sulprizio, R.M. Yantosca (2017), Global budget of tropospheric ozone: evaluating recent model advances with satellite (OMI), aircraft (IAGOS), and ozonesonde observations, Atmos. Environ., 167, 323-334, doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.08.036

Millet, D. B., M. Baasandorj. L. Hu, D. Mitroo, J. Turner, B. J. Williams, Nighttime chemistry and morning isoprene can drive daytime ozone downwind of a major deciduous forest, Environ. Sci. Technol., 50, 4335-4342

Schmidt, J. A., D. J. Jacob, H. Horowitz, L. Hu, T. Sherwen, M. Evans, Q. Liang, R. Suleiman, D. Oram, M. Le Breton, C. Parcival, S. Wang, B. Dix, and R. Volkamer, Modeling the observed tropospheric BrO background: Importance of multiphase chemistry and implications for ozone, OH, and mercury, J. Geophys. Res. 121, 11819–11835

Yan, Y.-Y., J.-T. Lin, J. Chen, L. Hu (2016), Improved simulation of tropospheric ozone by a global-multi-regional two-way coupling model system, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2381-2400

Hu, L., D.B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T.J. Griffis, K.R. Travis, C. Tessum, J. Marshall, W.F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, A. Wisthaler, M. Graus, C. Warneke, and J. de Gouw (2015a), Emissions of C6-C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 120, 826-842.

Hu, L., D.B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T.J. Griffis, P. Turner, D. Helmig, A.J. Curtis, J. Hueber (2015b), Isoprene emissions and impacts over an ecological transition region in the US Upper Midwest inferred from tall tower measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 120, 3553-3571

Baasandorj, M., D.B. Millet, L. Hu, D. Mitroo, and B.J. Williams (2015), Measuring acetic and formic acid by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry: Sensitivity, humidity dependence, and quantifying interferences, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 1301-1321.

Millet, D.B., M. Baasandorj, D.K. Farmer, J.A. Thornton, K. Baumann, P. Brophy, S. Chaliyakunnel, J.A. de Gouw, M. Graus, L. Hu, A. Koss, B.H. Lee, F.D. Lopez-Hilfiker, J.A. Neuman, F. Paulot, J. Peischl, I.B. Pollack, T.B. Ryerson, C. Warneke, B.J. Williams, and J. Xu (2015), A large and ubiquitous source of atmospheric formic acid, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 6283-6304.

Teaching Experience

Spring 2018 - CHEM 421 Advanced Instrumental Analysis

Spring 2017 - CHEM 541 Environmental Chemistry (co-teaching with Dr. Chris Palmer)