CoLang 2020 Facilitators and Presenters

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CoLang 2020 facilitators and presenters who are not on this list, please contact us at colang2020@gmail.com.

Fakhruddin Akhunzada

Fakhruddin Akhunzada

Fakhruddin Akhunzada is the executive director of the Forum for Language Initiatives (FLI), a training and resource centre based in Islamabad, Pakistan and serving the nearly 30 language communities spread across the northern and mountainous part of the country. He was among those who established FLI in 2002, and he later became its director in 2012. He has carried out research about his own Khowar-speaking community, a people numbering several hundred thousand people, and whose homeland is located in the far north and west of the of the country. One of his recent accomplishments was the completion of a capacity-building project in which his team invested resources in four under-documented and seriously under-resourced languages—Yidgha, Gawarbati, Dameli and Ushojo—to equip people from these communities to produce various forms of literature in their respective languages. This 1-year project represents only a small beginning but a crucial one for languages not previously written or acknowledged. Fakhruddin’s research interests lie mainly in the areas of cultural anthropology, sociality and the language ethnology of the linguistically and culturally diverse Chitral Valley as well as language policy issues that impact men, women and children of Pakistan. He has authored and co-authored several books and research papers. He is an alumnus of the 2014 CoLang and is currently a member of the CoLang Advisory Circle.  

Jeremiah Aviel

Jeremiah Aviel

Jeremiah Aviel is a farmer, falconer, survival instructor, community advocate, storyteller, and occasional linguist. He has conducted documentary fieldwork in Papua New Guinea and was part of Boerger’s Natqgu fieldwork team in 2015, working on a dictionary due out in 2021. That work used FLEx and Rapid Word Collection skills which he now also applies in his part-time work with The Language Conservancy. He previously collaborated with Boerger at ICLDC6 where they led two 90-minute workshops about Rapid Word Collection. He is passionate about the intersection of language in relation to space and place and identity, as well as revitalization through language and nature immersion. He himself has heritage roots in Mi’kmaq [mic], Irish [gle], and Hebrew [heb].

Chaney Bell

Chaney Bell

Chaney Bell (Salish & Qlispe) is an enrolled member of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes. Born and raised on the Flathead Indian Reservation, he graduated from Ronan High School, left to attend college at Haskell Indian Nations University in Kansas, and then returned home to finish his bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education at Salish Kootenai College (2008). It was at SKC that Chaney developed his deep love for the Salish language, and the understanding that the language is the foundation of what it means to be Salish. In 2002, he was one of the founders of the Nk̓ ʷusm Salish Immersion School in Arlee, where he worked for six years. Chaney is a proud husband and father of six children; his wife Echo Brown (Qlispe) is also deeply involved in Salish language work, and is now serving as an instructor at Nk̓ ʷusm. Chaney is now the Salish Language Coordinator for the Séliš-Q ̓lispé Culture Committee, a department of the CSKT government. In that capacity, he continues working hard to revitalize the endangered Salish language, carrying the broad responsibility of nurturing a more unified and strategically planned language effort on the reservation.

Andrea Berez-Kroeker

Andrea Berez-Kroeker

Andrea Berez-Kroeker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, where she mainly teaches language documentation and morphology classes. She has been an instructor at CoLang since 2008, and has also taught ELAN and other language documentation workshops at the Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute (CILLDI) and at the Linguistic Society of America Summer Institute. She is active in the world of language archiving, having served as the Director of the Kaipuleohone University of Hawaiʻi Digital Language Archive since 2011. Andrea has also partnered the development of two community archives, the Kaniʻāina Voices of the Land archive of spoken Hawaiian, and the C'ek'aedi Hwnax Ahtna language archive in Alaska.

Kaylene Big Knife

Kaylene Big Knife

Kaylene J. Big Knife is from the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy Reservation located in northcentral Montana. She is a graphic designer and a digital illustrator with a love for comic art and children storybooks. Big Knife’s educational background includes a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies from the University of Montana – Missoula and a master’s degree in Native American Languages and Linguistics from the University of Arizona. Big Knife has since returned home in order to assist with her tribe’s Cree and Ojibwe language preservation and revitalization efforts. She currently serves as Stone Child College’s Language and Archival Specialist. Her life passions and creative interests include: Indigenous language revitalization, pop culture, humor, comics, anime, manga, museums, video games, fiction writing, painting, and cats. 

Sonya Bird

Sonya Bird

Sonya Bird is an Associate Professor in Linguistics at the University of Victoria, in Victoria BC Canada. She has been documenting the details of pronunciation in Coast Salish languages since 2002, and has also worked on pronunciation with speakers of Dene languages, especially Dakelh (Carrier). She is particularly interested in the role of pronunciation and oral fluency in Indigenous language revitalization. Her current work is focused on supporting adult Hul’q’umi’num’ learners to speak proficiently and fluently. In collaboration with the Hul’q’umi’num’ Language and Culture Collective (HLCC) and the Hul’q’umi’num’ Language Academy (HLA), she has been documenting the details of pronunciation across Hul’q’umi’num’ speakers of different generations and fluency levels, to understand what the challenges are for learners and to help design tools and methods to overcome these challenges. On the pedagogical side, Sonya is particularly interested in exploring the benefits of incorporating phonetic analysis and “speech visualization” into pronunciation learning and teaching. She and Rae Anne Claxton (co-facilitator of the Praat workshop) have worked on this together, and she is excited to share their experiences with CoLang partipants! At UVic, Sonya has also been involved in designing and delivering the Masters in Indigenous Language Revitalization (MILR), offered jointly by the departments of Linguistics and Indigenous Education.

Makha Blu Wakpa

Makha Blu Wakpa

Dr. Makha Blu Wakpa—an enrolled citizen of the Itazipcho Lakota from The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe—is the Director of Fernandeño Tataviam’s Education & Cultural Learning Department and Pukúu Cultural Community Services’ Tutčint Youth Empowerment. In these positions, he manages $2M of grants from the California Department of Education (CDE) and California's Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC); and coordinates with city, county, and state council, Tribes, Tribal organizations, school districts, and universities. Makha holds a Ph.D. in Education and an M.A. in Native Studies from the University of Arizona, Tucson. Previously, he worked as the Executive Director of the San Francisco Bay Area-organization, Sacred Sites Protection & Rights of Indigenous Tribes. Makha began his youth organizing in Seattle with Tyree Scott Freedom School and is trained by The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond. His scholarly, professional, and personal interests are in employing evidence based programs, culturally-responsive education and Indigenous language revitalization to strengthen the wellbeing of Indigenous peoples, nations, and our mother earth. Makha is married to Dr. Tria Blu Wakpa, an Assistant Professor at UCLA, and is the father of their two daughters. 

Mosiah Bluecloud

Mosiah Bluecloud

Mosiah Bluecloud began working in Indigenous Language Revitalization in 2008. He started as an intern at the Sauk Language Department. He transitioned from an Audio and video technician to a member of the Sauk Language Department’s Modified Master Apprentice Program in 2010. After 1,280 hours of learning Sauk as an Apprentice and 668 hours of professional development training in Native Language Teaching Methodologies, Mosiah became the lead instructor of the Sauk Language. He taught community classes across three counties, a Sauk Language course at Bacone College, and two levels of Sauk at Shawnee High School. He left the Sauk Language department and got his B.A. in Linguistics in Spring 2016, from the University of Oklahoma, and established the Kickapoo Language program later that fall. He is currently working on his Master of Arts in Native American Languages and Linguistics at the University of Arizona.

Brenda Boerger

Brenda Boerger

Brenda Boerger did language development work for 20 years based in the Solomon Islands and  continued that work from the US as SIL Language and Culture Documentation Services Coordinator from 2011-2019. She has been teaching language documentation at Dallas International University since 2011, and co-authored a Language and Culture Documentation textbook with her co-instructor there along with two former students. She is now updating Natqgu [ntu] corpus files for archiving and community access. Her main corpus goal during 2020 is to produce, publish, and distribute an illustrated and annotated Natqgu-English version of The Autobiography of Simon G. Meabr, 1921-2013, with an accompanying audio recording. Boerger is also helping produce new Natqgu literacy materials using Bloom book-making software, the subject of the workshop she is co-facilitating with Jeremiah Aviel. Her goal is to see students and communities flourish.

Loren Bommelyn

Loren Bommelyn

Loren Bommelyn, a ceremonial leader and past chair of the Tolowa Nation, has been actively working in the maintenance and revitalization of the Tolowa language and culture all his life. He has an MA in Linguistics, taught the Tolowa language in the Crescent City highschool for many years, designed the Tolowa writing system and brought it through several incarnations. He has written books, articles and flyers in and about the Tolowa language for his community, and has been deeply involved with increasing the fluency of his family members and others. His own work on language learning inspired the design of the Master-Apprentice Language Program from the beginning, and he has served as a Master speaker for several apprentices.

Pyuwa Bommelyn

Pyuwa Bommelyn

Pyuwa Bommelyn, son of Loren, grew up in the ceremonial traditions of his parents, but thought only a little about the Tolowa language until a near-death experience in a plane accident caused him to shift his priorities. Now with a Master’s degree in linguistics and strengthened proficiency in his language through Master-Apprentice work with his father, he has also served as a Master-speaker for his wife Ruby in the Master-Apprentice Program. He has developed language curriculum for the Tolowa Nation, and he and his wife are raising his children in the language.

Ruby Tuttle Bommelyn

Ruby Bommelyn

Ruby Tuttle Bommelyn has a strong education in teaching, and is using her skills to home-school her children so that they can learn their language and culture. Ruby has herself been learning Tolowa from Loren and Pyuwa Bommelyn (her father-in-law and her husband) through the Master-Apprentice program. She has developed language curriculum and has taught on that subject in workshops around the state and also at The Northwest Indigenous Languages Institute (NILI).

Kathryn Pewenofkit Briner

Kathryn Pewenofkit Briner

Kathryn Pewenofkit Briner, DMA, is an insurgent linguist, practical lexicographer, mother, partner, and indigenous feminist killjoy. She is currently the Director of Language Planning ad Development for the Comanche Nation and is Kiowa, Comanche, and [Plains/Kiowa] Apache. As a President’s Fellow, she has recently completed all coursework for a second PhD in Comparative Studies (Linguistics/Cultural Rhetorics) at Florida Atlantic University focusing on Comanche-centered language reclamation through insurgent research methods (Adam Gaudry), methodology of visiting (Dylan AT Miner), and the Comanche 4 Rs: relationships, reciprocities, redistribution, and resurgence. She was previously the Lineberger Multicultural Scholar in Residence at Lenoir-Rhyne University. Beyond language work, Kate's research interests include intergenerational trauma and healing in Indigenous communities, sovereignty, Indigenous futurisms, and identity and cultural rhetorics through Indigenous popular music.

Aaron Broadwell

Aaron Broadwell

Aaron Broadwell is Elling Eide Professor of Anthropology at University of Florida.  He works with communities in the southeastern US (Choctaw, Seminole) and Oaxaca, Mexico (Copala Triqui, Zapotec) to help develop dictionaries, texts, and other language materials.  He also works on Timucua, a sleeping language of northern Florida.  He was the Director of CoLang 2018 at University of Florida.

Phil Cash Cash

 

Camille Callison

Camille Callison

Camille Callison is a Tahltan Nation member, the Indigenous Strategies Librarian at the University of Manitoba and a PhD student in Anthropology. She chairs the International Federation of Libraries Association (IFLA) - Indigenous Matters Section; is a member of the National Film Board of Canada - Indigenous Advisory Group; and an Indigenous Partner on the Canadian Steering Committee on Archives - Truth and Reconciliation Commission Taskforce on Archives. Camille was on the founding board of the Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA-FCAB) where she chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Committee, was the founding Chair of the Indigenous Matters Committee and a Copyright Committee member as well as serving as the Vice-Chair the Canadian Commission for UNESCO Memory of the World Committee that founded Canada’s national program.

Sean Chandler

 

Shobhana Chelliah

Shobhana Chelliah

Shobhana Chelliah is Professor of Linguistics and Associate Dean of Research and Advancement at the College of Information, University of North Texas.  Her research focuses on the documentation of the TransHimalayan (formerly known as Tibeto-Burman) languages of Northeast India.  She is currently partnering with national and academic institutions in India to create a state-of-the-art archive for the long term preservation and access of language documentation materials at the UNT Digital Library called the Computational Resource for South Asian Language (CoRSAL).  Her publications include A Grammar of Meithei (Mouton 1997) and The Handbook of Descriptive Linguistic Fieldwork (Springer 2011) as well as articles on differential case marking and language contact in TransHimalyan.  Stemming from her own work  in areas of political conflict, she is interested in exploring how best to use the strengths of the fields of language documentation and political science to understand types of conflict, language endangerment, and ways of studying these.

Melvatha Chee

Melvatha Chee

Melvatha R. Chee is Tsé Nahabiłnii, Kin Łichíi’nii, Hooghan Łání and Áshįįhí, a Diné woman from Lake Valley, New Mexico. She has over 15 years of experience working with her heritage language in a professional capacity. This includes interpretation, translation, transcription, teaching and research. Dr. Chee’s work includes teaching the Diné language at the University of New Mexico, serving as an official interpreter for the U.S. Department of Justice, and translating voting ballots for the State of New Mexico. Her research work analyzes child language data collected from first language speakers of Navajo. She primarily examines how children learn to use the morphologically complex Navajo verb. Additionally, she is working to build a Navajo language corpus consisting of stories, narratives, and conversations. Her research interests include first language acquisition, morphophonology, polysynthesis, semantics, morphology, the application of cognitive linguistics to Navajo, and the intersection between language, culture and linguistics, and indigenous language sustainability. Dr. Chee, a United States Marine Corps Veteran, is a fluent speaker of Navajo and became literate at a very young age. As a linguistically trained individual, she offers a unique insight into research on Navajo. Melvatha has firsthand experience in linguistic fieldwork with indigenous communities. She has collected, processed and analyzed Navajo language data, and collaborated on several successful grant-writing projects. Melvatha works hard to maintain a connection to her culture to enrich her Navajo language skills, knowledge and wellbeing. Melvatha, an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the University of New Mexico, is currently serving as Director of the Navajo Language Program.

Rae Anne Claxton

Rae Anne Claxton

Rae Anne Claxton is a member of Tsawout First Nation. She was born in Quw’utsun (Cowichan) where she currently resides with her husband and two children. She was raised between both of her communities, spending much of her childhood living in Quw’utsun with her paternal grandmother, a first language speaker of Hul’q’umi’num’. Three of Rae Anne’s four late grandparents were from Quw’utsun. Rae Anne is currently pursuing a MA through Simon Fraser University, focusing on the Linguistics of Hul’q’umi’num’. Throughout that time, she has used Praat to focus on hers and her elders’ speech in order to visualize ways in which she could improve her Hul’q’umi’num’. Although Rae Anne was never formally taught Hul’q’umi’num’ by her grandmother, she was exposed to many of her grandmother’s conversations, natural expressions, self-talk, and she was spoken to in the language—given commands, encouragement, and guidance. The richness of the sounds sound like home to her. Rae Anne was instrumental in applying for, and establishing a Hul’q’umi’num’ language nest with her fellow Hul’q’umi’num’ Language Academy (HLA) classmates under Hul’q’umi’num’ Language and Cultural Collective (HLCC), funded by the First Peoples Cultural Council (FPCC). She has continued playing a part in FPCC funded language programming and resource development, currently focusing on Hul’q’umi’num’ stories. Rae Anne has also been invited into both of her communities to share her language learning journey. She is passionate about revitalizing her language in her family, in her community, in her life. She is currently working diligently towards Hul’q’umi’num’ fluency through FPCC’s Mentor-Apprentice Program with her si’lu (grandma), her late grandfather’s first cousin. It is her goal to eventually become multi-lingual—joining her people in respecting the diversity of the languages that stem from the land through learning them, using them and passing them on.

Christopher Cox

Christopher Cox

Christopher Cox is an Assistant Professor in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University. His research centres on issues in language documentation, description, and revitalization, with a special focus on the creation and application of permanent, accessible collections of language resources (corpora). For the past twenty years, he has been involved with community-based language documentation, education, and revitalization efforts, most extensively in partnership with speakers of Plautdietsch, the traditional language of the Dutch-Russian Mennonites, and with Dene communities in Alberta and the Yukon.

Emiliana Cruz

Emiliana Cruz

Emiliana Cruz is originally from San Juan Quiahije, Oaxaca. She received her PhD in Linguistic Anthropology from the University of Texas Austin (UT) in 2011. She specializes in social and linguistic anthropology. Her work focuses mainly on the application of anthropological methods for the documentation and preservation of languages now approaching extinction. In particular, she works with Chatino communities in Oaxaca using participatory research methods in which she works directly with communities and creates with them pedagogical materials for the preservation of language and culture. Her areas of interest in anthropology are education, linguistic landscape, language documentation and revitalization, autonomy and territory, and linguistic rights. Emiliana Cruz currently works at CIESAS-DF. Likewise, she has organized workshops for both the elaboration of pedagogical grammars and tones for speakers of Otomanguean languages. She is a native speaker of Chatino and founder of the Chatino Language Documentation Project.

Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins

Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins

Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins is currently working on two legacy dictionary projects, one with the Nxaʔamxčín Language Program of Colville Tribes and the other with the SENĆOŦEN-speaking community in W̱SÁNEĆ on Vancouver Island. Her community-engaged work has included projects on pronunciation and its role in language learning, on ethical issues in language documentation, on Community-Based Language Research methodology in linguistics, on policies and practices in evaluating community-engaged scholarship, and on language revitalization. Since 2003 she has been an ally in the development and delivery of Indigenous Language Revitalization undergraduate and graduate programs at the University of Victoria, where she teaches. She taught at CoLang in 2014, 2016 and 2018, and she is on the CoLang Advisory Circle.

Jenny L. Davis

Jenny Davis

Jenny L. Davis is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she is the director of the Native American and Indigenous Languages (NAIL) Lab and an affiliate faculty of American Indian Studies and Gender & Women’s Studies. She earned her PhD in Linguistics at University of Colorado, Boulder in 2013. Her research focuses on Indigenous language revitalization both within tribal jurisdictions and in urban contexts and the repatriation of linguistic and anthropological collections from Indigenous communities. Her 2018 book, Talking Indian: Identity and Language Revitalization in the Chickasaw Renaissance, focuses on Chickasaw language revitalization efforts.

Aspen Decker

Aspen Decker

Aspen Decker is a proud member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (T̓at̓ayáqn Séliš). Currently she is an MA student in linguistics at the University of Montana. She earned a BA in tribal historic preservation from Salish Kootenai College. Aspen is a Salish language instructor at the Salish Kootenai College. She is one of the last of 17 fluent Salish speakers left today, and she speaks only Salish to her four children and raising first language speakers of Salish. Aspen was recently awarded a grant from the Endangered Language Fund (ELF) for her project “kʷƛ̓ep Qe Sox̣ʷèp (Revive Our Roots) language project for creating a seasonal curriculum, that teaches Indigenous knowledge and Séliš epistemology together with Séliš language.

Lise Dobrin

Lise Dobrin

Lise M. Dobrin, University of Virginia. At the center of Lise Dobrin’s life and career are Arapesh people of Papua New Guinea. Her research interests range from analyzing structure and change—including shift—in Arapesh languages, to understanding the legacy of past work on Arapesh language and culture, to working with community stakeholders on new ways to preserve and circulate knowledge of their local history. In her own family life, she has grappled with questions about the transmission of Jewish knowledge and values. She places these questions within the same frame as those she asks about linguistic and cultural continuity in her research.

Joseph Dupris

 Joe-Dupris-2.jpg

Joseph Dupris, MA, is enrolled in the Klamath Tribes and is of Modoc, Klamath, Paiute and Lakota descent. He is.a doctoral candidate in the Joint Anthropology and Linguistics (ANLI) program at the University of Arizona. Dupris was introduced to maqlaqsyals as a child attending tribal culture camps. His interest in language was reignited in 2013 when he returned to Chiloquin and participated in adult maqlaqsyals language classes after graduating from the University of Washington with a degree in American Indian Studies. He received his Master’s degree in Linguistics through NAMA at the University of Arizona in August 2015. Dupris has volunteered with the American Indian Language Development Institute (AILDI) for four years, and is an instructor for the AILDI 2020 Summer Institute.

Robert Elliot

Robert Elliot

Robert Elliott is the Associate Director of Educational Technology and Senior Instructor for the Northwest Indian Language Institute (NILI) at the University of Oregon (UO). He began working as an ESL classroom-based language instructor over 20 years ago, and has extensive experience as an online instructor and teacher educator, including teaching classes in the UO Linguistics MA program for pre-service language teachers. He began working in language revitalization in 2009. He currently coordinates NILI online initiatives, leads several youth outreach projects, and maintains the NILI Resource Center, a digital share space of teaching materials for several languages of the Pacific Northwest. He is an active member of the UO’s Native Strategies Resource Group and serves as a mentor to Native high school participants at NILI’s annual Summer Institute. Robert is a regular presenter at national and international conferences on language revitalization and language learning technology, and he has published research on computer-assisted language learning and community-university partnerships in language revitalization. Robert is a Navajo descendent.

Naatosi Fish

Naatosi Fish

Naatosi Fish is currently an MBA student and the Elementary Blackfoot teacher at The University of Montana. Naatosi has a background in Linguistics and works with his collaborator, Dr. Mizuki Miyashita to conduct research on the pitch of Blackfoot, of which they have published a paper together. Naatosi is passionate about teaching and learning his language and uses a mix of linguistics, pedagogical theory, and cultural practices to build activities and materials for his class.

Colleen Fitzgerald

Colleen Fitzgerald

Colleen Fitzgerald directed CoLang 2014 while on faculty at the University of Texas at Arlington and has facilitated workshops at each institute since 2010.  In addition to CoLang, she has led workshops for the American Indian Language Development Institute, the Oklahoma Breath of Life Workshop, the Linguistic Society of America Linguistic Institute, and the Oklahoma Native Language Association.  Last summer, she concluded four years of service at the National Science Foundation, where she served as the Program Director for the Documenting Endangered Languages partnership (now DLI-DEL), a joint initiative between NSF and the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Fitzgerald is currently collaborating with Dr. Joshua Hinson and the Chickasaw Language Revitalization Program on a revitalization-driven documentation project for Chickasaw, a Native American language. She is also an Associate Editor for the Linguistic Society of America's flagship journal, Language, leading its new section on Language Revitalization and Documentation. Currently, she is the Associate Vice President for Research and Professor of English at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi, where her efforts include fostering interdisciplinary research and increasing the number of funded grants. 

Margaret Florey

Margaret Florey

Dr. Margaret Florey is an Australian linguist and language activist whose work has largely been concerned with the documentation and revitalisation of endangered Indigenous languages alongside training Indigenous language activists. Margaret holds a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and taught linguistics for eighteen years. She co-founded the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (www.rnld.org) in 2004, and created and directed the Documenting and Revitalising Indigenous Languages (DRIL) Training Program at RNLD until mid-2017. In the Training Director's role at RNLD, Margaret delivered grassroots training across Australia to Aboriginal people in family groups, communities and Indigenous organisations. She was a founding member of the InField/CoLang Advisory Circle and served on the AC from 2008-1016. Margaret taught workshops in Language Activism, Project Planning, and Grant Writing at InField 2008 (UC Santa Barbara), InField 2010 (U Oregon), CoLang 2014 (U Texas at Arlington), CoLang 2016 (U Alaska at Fairbanks) and CoLang 2018 (U Florida). She has also twice taught at CILLDI (Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Institute, Edmonton) in 2009 and 2010, and at the First Nations Languages Program at UBC (2009).

Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla

Candace Galla

Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla (Kanaka Hawaiʻi) from the island of Hawaiʻi is an Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (Faculty of Arts) and the Department of Language and Literacy Education (Faculty of Education). Her scholarship and practice focus on Hawaiian language and Indigenous languages at the intersection of education, revitalization, digital technology, well-being, traditional and cultural practices, and policy and planning; and decolonizing and Indigenizing the academy to create pathways for Indigenous thinkers and scholars, and scholarship – locally, nationally, and globally. Prior to her position at UBC, she taught at Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawaiʻi Hilo, and served as the Program Coordinator for the American Indian Language Development Institute at the University of Arizona.

Susan Gehr

Susan Gehr

Susan Gehr, Karuk, is a reference librarian at College of the Redwoods, and a Co-Convener of CoLang’s Advisory Circle (2014-2019). Several years into learning to speak Karuk through community classes, and the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival’s Master-Apprentice Language Learning Program, Susan finished an MA in linguistics, going on to work on Karuk language documentation and co-publishing the Karuk Dictionary with linguist William Bright. In the course of her work creating and collecting Karuk language materials for the tribe’s Karuk Language Program, Susan wrote a thesis, an oral history of AICLS’ Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous California Languages, for her MLIS through San José State University.  She is interested in seeing language community activists take care of their personal language collections with preservation and appropriate access in mind.

Spike Gildea

Spike Gildea

Spike Gildea is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Oregon. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer teaching English in Nepal (1983-85), then in 1988 began descriptive linguistics work in South America, where, supported by multiple NSF grants, he has collected primary data from speakers of 15 Cariban languages spoken in Venezuela, Brazil, and Guyana. His primary publications are in historical syntax, comparative Cariban studies, and typology. He has taught at all six InField/CoLang summer institutes, serving also as Director of InField 2010 (which was held at the University of Oregon). He is currently working with two colleagues on a DEL-financed project to document the Yawarana language of Venezuela; he is also collaborating with the Katxuyana schoolteachers and the NGO Iepé (Institute de Pesquisa e Formação Indigena) in Brazil to develop literacy and language education materials in and for the Katxuyana language.

Jaime Perez Gonzalez

Jaime Perez Gonzalez

Jaime Perez Gonzalez is a native speaker of Tseltal (Mayan) from Tenango, in the Municipality of Ocosingo, Chiapas, Mexico. He is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Texas at Austin, and his dissertation consists of a Descriptive Grammar of Mocho’, a highly endangered Mayan language spoken in Motozintla and Tuzantan, Chiapas, Mexico. His CIESAS thesis entitled “Predicados expresivos e ideófonos en tseltal” won the 2013 Wigberto Jiménez Moreno Prize, awarded by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) for the best master’s thesis in linguistics. He has done research on different languages including Spanish, Tseltal, Nicaragua Miskitu (Misumalpan language), and Mocho’. Among his interests are language documentation, language revitalization, descriptive linguistics and language contact. He is a former Graduate Research Assistant at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America, and he is currently the principal investigator of the project Documentation of Mocho' (Mayan): Language Preservation through Community Awareness and Engagement, funded by the Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) at the University of London.

Neyooxet Greymorning

Neyooxet Greymorning

Dr. Neyooxet Greymorning is a full professor in the departments of Anthropology and Native American Studies at the University of Montana.  As well as having conducted language workshops among First Nations peoples of Australia, Canada, and the United States, he has maintained an active research and teaching agenda that includes Indigenous sovereignty and contemporary global issues of Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Health and Healing, and Native American language rejuvenation and retention. Professor Greymorning earned his Ph.D. from University of Oklahoma in 1992, and began his academic career at the University of Alberta. He served as the Acting Director of the Indigenous Governance Programs at the University of Victoria in British Columbia from 2001-2002, was a visiting scholar at Australia’s Southern Cross university; 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and the University of New England; 2013, 2014, and 2017. Neyooxet’s work in developing strategies toward strengthening and sustaining Native languages led to his developing Accelerated Second Language Acquisition (ASLA©™).  He is the founder and Executive Director of Hinono'eitiino’oowu' – Arapaho Language Lodge, and was named three times to Who's Who Among America’s College and University Teachers (1999, 2004, 2005). In 2017 he received a Lifetime Achievement award for his work, and in 2018 delivered a President’s Distinguished lecture; Wading into the Waters of Language, Culture and Reality, on his work to test dolphins for human language cognition. His most recent publications include; Beyond IHS: Indigenous Knowledge and Traditional Approaches to Health and Healing, is a chapter in American Indian Health and Nursing; The Anglocentric Supremacy of the Marshall Court, published in the Albany Government Law Review; and his book Being Indigenous, Perspectives on Activism, Culture, Language and Identity, Routledge Press, was published November 2018.

Ryan Henke

Ryan Henke

Ryan Henke is a PhD student from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. His research stands at the intersection of language acquisition, documentation, and revitalization. His dissertation investigates how young children learn to speak Northern East Cree as their mother tongue in the community of Chisasibi. He attended CoLang in 2014, and he spent three summers working with the Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute (CILLDI) at the University of Alberta. This work included teaching a course entitled Technologies for Endangered Language Documentation as well as a computer workshop to help CILLDI attendees become more comfortable with technology.

Leanne Hinton

Leanne Hinton

Leanne Hinton is a professor emerita in Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley, and a founding member of the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival (AICLS). She co-designed the Master-Apprentice Language Learning Program and the Breath of Life workshops and institutes for Indigenous languages without speakers. She has written and edited many articles and books on language revitalization, including The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice (with Ken Hale, 2001), How to Keep Your Language Alive (with Nancy Steele et al, 2002), Bringing our Languages Home (2013) and The Routledge Handbook of Language Revitalization (with Leena Huss and Gerald Roche, 2018).

Tracy Hirata-Edds

Tracy Hirata-Edds

Tracy Hirata-Edds, Ph.D. Child Language, is a Multi-Term Lecturer at the University of Kansas’ Applied English Center. She was a Peace Corps Volunteer and Fulbright Scholar in Nepal. Tracy partners with Native communities to enhance opportunities for culture/language maintenance and revitalization, curriculum and assessment design, teacher training, lesson and materials development, and children’s first and second language acquisition. She worked as a consultant to Cherokee Nation’s Language Revitalization Program and currently consults with the Miami Tribe's language revitalization effort through the Myaamia Center at Miami University. Additionally, she supports revitalization efforts through workshops, research, and teacher trainings in various contexts, including with Oklahoma Breath of Life and CoLang.

Raymond Huaute

Raymond Huaute

Ray Huaute is a second-year Ph.D. student in the Linguistics Department at UC San Diego.  He also holds an MA in Native American Linguistics at the University of Arizona and a BA in Native American Studies from UC Riverside.  His main research interests include, language documentation and description, as well as community-based linguistics and language reclamation.  Ray was recently awarded a grant from the Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) for his project entitled “Expanding the Documentation and Description of Cahuilla” to conduct fieldwork on the Desert dialect of Cahuilla, an under-documented Uto-Aztecan language of Southern California.  Ray has extensive experience as a tribal language instructor for the Morongo School, located on the Morongo Indian Reservation in Southern California, where he has taught Cahuilla since 2013.  He has also assisted Morongo and other Cahuilla tribes in the development of tribal language curriculum and assessment tools for K-12.  His classroom teaching experience has centered on the use of various language immersion methods including, WAYK, ALSA, TPR, STPR and other task-based activities that build up a learner’s situational fluency.  Ray is also a tribal community member and second-language speaker of Cahuilla. 

Lisa Johnson

Lisa Johnson

Lisa M. Johnson is a PhD candidate in linguistic anthropology at the University of Utah, with an MA in linguistics. As a former graduate assistant at the Shoshoni Language Project, she worked as the Laboratory Manager and as the Project Coordinator for the Shoshoni/Goshute Youth Language Apprenticeship Program, a 6-week summer residential program where tribal youth learn their heritage language from fluent elders and work on language revitalization projects. At the SLP Lisa also worked with community language instructors, preparing teacher resources, revising and editing curriculum materials, and presenting at teacher training workshops. Lisa has taught Russian and Korean to beginning learners and has thirteen semesters’ experience teaching linguistics to undergraduates. She has also conducted fieldwork in the Kingdom of Tonga and the Republic of Nauru. She attended CoLang for the first time in 2016 and co-taught the Memrise course in 2018.

Susan Kalt

Susan Kalt

Susan Kalt is a linguist and language curriculum designer whose research focuses on the sequential language acquisition of Quechua and Spanish. Since 2008 she has cultivated relationships and teamwork among indigenous educators and community members in Peru and Bolivia to document and promote the languages spoken in rural Cuzco and Chuquisaca. She has created a collection of recorded interviews at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America and continues to explore ways to promote teaching materials and programs to celebrate Quechua where it is spoken, working currently with partners in South Bolivia. She has presented on linguistics, documentation and curriculum development to language educators, graduate and undergraduate students at universities around the US, Bolivia and Peru. She holds an MA in Education from University of Massachusetts, Boston and PhD. In Linguistics from the University of Southern California and is Professor of Spanish at Roxbury Community College in Boston, Massachusetts.

Susan Smythe Kung

Susan Smythe Kung

Susan Smythe Kung PhD, is the manager of the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA), as well as a documentary linguist specializing in languages and cultures of the Americas. As co-PI on various NSF and NEH grants, Kung is internationally engaged in the formulation of best practices for organizing, archiving, sharing, and citing language documentation data. She is the outgoing president of the Digital Endangered Languages and Musics Archives Network (delaman.org), and she has co-facilitated various workshops at CoLang since 2014. The data and analyses from her own language documentation work on Huehuetla Tepehua, an indigenous language of Mexico, are archived at AILLA.

Wendy Leandro-Springer

Wendy Leandro-Springer

Wendy Mary Leandro-Springer is a Portuguese and Use of English Lecturer at the University of Guyana. She holds a Master's degree in Language and Culture/Linguistics and a Bachelor of Arts in Languages and Literature – Portuguese/English, both from the Federal University of Roraima, Brazil. Her publications include: "The nominal system in Wapichana" of which she is a co-author and will be published in 2020 by Linguistic Variation; "Relative Clauses in Wapichana and the Interpretation  of Multiple embedded 'uraz' constructions", which is a chapter of a book called Recursion across Domains, published by Cambridge University press in 2018; "The Interpretation of Multiple Embedded Genitive Constructions by Wapichana and English speakers" of which she is the author and was published by Revista Linguistica in 2014 and a Pedagogical Grammar in Wapichana, complied together with Professor Dr. Luiz Amaral and Wapichana teachers in Roraima, Brazil. Ms. Leandro-Springer originates from Aishalton village, Region # 9, Guyana South America.

Seunghun Lee

 Suunghun Lee

Seunghun Lee is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan, where he teaches phonetics, phonology and field methods courses. He has been an instructor at CoLang in 2016 and 2018, and has co-taught a course on experimental methods in language documentation. He actively works with various language communities in South Africa (Xitsonga, SiSwati, Tshivenda) and India (Drenjongke) and conducts phonetic and phonological documentation.

Wesley Y. Leonard

Wesley Leonard

Wesley Y. Leonard received his Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, and is currently an assistant professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside. His primary research examines and theorizes sociopolitical factors that are intertwined with Native American language endangerment, documentation, and reclamation. A citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, he focuses in particular on the reclamation of his tribal nation’s language, myaamia (Miami), and on building capacity for Native American languages in ways that support tribal sovereignty and survivance. A collaborative project that he co-chairs, Natives4Linguistics, promotes Indigenous needs and intellectual tools as ways of doing linguistic science. His work has appeared in scholarly outlets including the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Gender and Language, Language Documentation & Conservation, and Language Documentation and Description.

Mary Linn

Mary Linn

Mary S. Linn is Curator of Cultural and Linguistic Revitalization at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Her primary research is in effective grassroots strategies in language and cultural sustainability, especially in small language communities.  Before coming to the Smithsonian, she initiated the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair, a yearly two-day event that brings in over 2,000 youth who are learning their Native languages, and she was the founding curator of the Native American Languages Collection at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. Currently, she is the director of Language Revitalization Initiative, a part of CFCH Cultural Sustainability collaborations and research. For thirty years, she has been active in training in community members in linguistics, language teaching, and archiving. She was a co-founder and instructor for the Oklahoma Native Languages Association, a co-founder of the Sino-Tibetan Language Research Methodology Workshop, and has been a co-instructor and on the Advisory Circle for CoLang.  Linn also serves on the Smithsonian Recovering Voices Mother Tongue Language Film Festival, on the steering committee of the National Breath of Life Archival Institute, and on advisory board for the Endangered Languages Project. 

Megan Lukaniec

Tim McCleary

Tim McCleary

Tim McCleary received his Ph.D.  in anthropology at the University of Illinois: Urbana-Champaign, and is a professor at Little Big Horn College, the Crow tribal college. McCleary has always had an interest in how different cultures look at the world. This interest lead him to the field of anthropology. Through his studies he has examined various aspects of the historic and contemporary culture of the Apsáalooke or Crow Indians of Montana.

Melanie McKay-Cody

Melanie McKay-Cody

Dr. Melanie McKay-Cody is a Cherokee Deaf and earned her doctoral degree in linguistic and socio-cultural anthropology at the University of Oklahoma. She has studied critically-endangered indigenous sign languages in North America since 1994 and helps different tribes preserve their tribal signs. She also specialized in Indigenous Deaf studies and interpreter training incorporating Native culture, North American Indian Sign Language and ASL.

Gaby Vargas Melgarejo

Gaby Vargas Melgarejo

Gaby Vargas Melgarejo is a Quechua and Spanish speaking indigenous woman from Tiquipaya, Bolivia. She is passionate about analyzing her native language and hopes to create materials to meet the demand for Bolivian families to read, write and study it. She is also interested in contributing to linguistic science based on Andean languages and world views. She has an undergraduate degree in Quechua language from the Universidad Mayor de San Simon; her thesis was based on observing and assisting teachers in public elementary schools in Tiquipaya. She holds a master’s degree in Sociolinguistics from the Program in Bilingual Intercultural Education (ProEIB Andes) at the same university. Her master’s thesis involved three months of participant observation in the Tarabuco region, living with rural families and exploring the effects on the language of widespread migration to towns and cities.

Leroy Morgan

 

Cordella Moses

Cordella Moses

Cordella Moses is a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe located in eastern Arizona. Cordella works at the tribal language program and is a language instructor at the San Carlos Apache Tribal College. Cordella is a fluent speaker who also contributes language pieces to the local tribal radio. Cordella is a participant in the American Indian Language Development Institute’s Language Vitality Project (NSF BSC #1601738).

Julene Narcia

Julene Narcia

Julene Narcia is Hopi and a member of the Tohono O'odham Nation. She was previously employed with the Ak-Chin Indian Community's Language program engaging in the language and culture with the community youth and pre-school. Julene is a second language learner. Julene is a participant in the American Indian Language Vitality Project (NSF BSC #1601738).

Sheilah Nicolas

Sheilah Nicholas

Sheilah E. Nicholas is a member of the Hopi Tribe located in Arizona.  She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies (TLSS) at the University of Arizona (UA). She teaches courses in Indigenous Culture-Based Education, Language and Culture, Oral Traditions, Language Minority Education, and Teacher Research.  She is also a Faculty Instructor for the American Indian Language Development Institute (AILDI) and Immersion Instructor-Consultant for the Indigenous Language Institute, Sante Fe, NM. Her scholarship and research focus includes: Indigenous/Hopi language maintenance and reclamation, Indigenous language ideologies and epistemologies, the intersection of language, culture and identity, and Indigenous language teacher education.  Her publications draw on her dissertation, “Becoming ‘Fully’ Hopi: The Role of the Hopi Language in the Contemporary Lives of Hopi Youth—A Hopi Case Study of Language Shift and Vitality” and her work with the Hopi Tribe’s Hopilavayi Summer Institute for Hopi language teachers (2004-2010). Along with colleagues Dr. Teresa McCarty and Dr. Michael Seltzer at UCLA and Dr. Tiffany Lee at UNM, she is the UA Co-PI of a national study, “Indigenous-Language Immersion and Native American Student Achievement” funded by the Spencer Foundation. 

Stacey Oberly

Stacey Oberly

Dr. Stacey Oberly, Southern Ute, is the Coordinator for Ute Language and Culture at the Southern Ute Indian Montessori Academy.  She works actively in language documentation and revitalization, including the training of community members in revitalization strategies and policy, language documentation, descriptive linguistics and culturally-based language curriculum through the American Indian Language Development Institute at the University of Arizona.  Dr. Oberly’s recent scholarly work focuses on grassroots language revitalization, and Numic phonetics.

Carolyn O'Meara

Carolyn O'Meara

Carolyn O'Meara is currently an associate research professor in the Department of Indigenous Languages at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She received her PhD in Linguistics from the University at Buffalo, SUNY in 2010. She is especially interested in topics related to language, culture and cognition, specifically as it pertains to spatial language and the language of perception. She combines methods from the areas of language documentation, linguistic anthropology and psycholinguistics to try to better understand to what extent language and culture play roles in shaping cognition. Of particular interest is the landscape domain, which was the focus of her PhD thesis. Since 2004, she has been working together with speakers of Seri, a language isolate spoken in northwestern Mexico. She has compiled and co-published various texts in Seri together with Seri speakers and has organized small groups dedicated to editing texts in the Seri language.

Yoshi Ono

Yoshi Ono

Yoshi Ono (Professor in East Asian Studies at the University of Alberta) is a specialist in Japanese conversation and grammar. Since 2006, he has been doing fieldwork on the Ikema dialect of the Miyako language spoken on three Japanese islands near Taiwan. He also directs the Spoken Discourse Research Studio at Alberta. He has been teaching at CoLang (formerly InField) since its inception in 2008.

Tyler Peterson

Tyler Peterson

Tyler Peterson received his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2010 and joined Arizona State University in 2018, with previous positions at the University of Arizona and the University of Auckland. He has worked in Polynesia, Brazil, and with various tribal groups in the American Southwest, training community language activists in language documentation, traditional ecological knowledge, orthography, and policy. He has undertaken extensive fieldwork on the endangered indigenous language Gitksan (Tsimshianic, British Columbia). His primary interests are in the study of semantics and pragmatics, and the development of field methodologies that probe these kinds of meanings.   

Jean-Luc Pierite

Jean-Luc Pierite

Jean-Luc Pierite, originally from New Orleans, Louisiana, now resides in Boston. Jean-Luc serves as President of the Board of Directors for the North American Indian Center of Boston. Jean-Luc also volunteers with his Tribe's Language and Culture Revitalization Program which is a collaboration with Tulane University in New Orleans. This program is based on tradition passed from Jean-Luc's great-grandfather Joseph Alcide Pierite, Sr., last traditional chief and medicine man of the Tunica-Biloxi. The Tribe is an amalgamation of members from the Central Louisiana communities of: Tunica, Biloxi-Choctaw, Ofo, and Avoyel. Jean-Luc has a B.A. in Humanities with a co-major in Mass Communication and Japanese from Dillard University in New Orleans. He also earned an A.S. in Video Game Design from Full Sail University in Orlando, Florida. Jean-Luc currently is the International Procurement and Logistics Manager for The Fab Foundation. The Fab Foundation was formed in 2009 to facilitate and support the growth of the international fab lab network as well as the development of regional capacity-building organizations.

Carlos Flores Quispe

Carlos-Flores-Quispe.PNG

Carlos Flores Quispe is an Indigenous man from Candelaria, Chuquisaca, Bolivia who speaks Quechua, Spanish and English. He has a bachelor’s degree in English and Quechua from the Universidad San Francisco Xavier in Chuquisaca, with a pre-degree in Sociology, granted by the University of Hradec Králové in the Czech Republic where he also taught Quechua. He studied to expand his leadership and community service skills at the University of Arizona’s Institute for Training and Development in the United States. He is prepared in Leadership and Personal Marketing; Human Relationships for Personal Development awarded by “ELIMDH” Escuela de Liderazgo Marketing y Desarrollo Humano from Lima, Peru; he participated in the 1st International Congress of Linguistics at the Linguistic Department of Tomás Frías Autonomous University, Potosí; he participated in Fifth National ELT Conference "Technology in ELT" at the Language Department  of the Juan Misael Saracho Autonomous University, Tarija. He loves singing, dancing, graphic and audiovisual design. For Carlos, keeping the Quechua language and culture alive represents keeping love for PACHAMAMA (mother earth in Quechua) alive and maintaining the three principle values and morals; AMA SUWA, AMA LLULLA and AMA QHILLA (don't steal, don't lie and don't be lazy). He is interested in contributing to the revitalization of the Quechua language with pedagogical didactic materials and design for experiential learning by both children and adults through creation of textiles and traditions in places where the language is spoken.

Marilyn Reed

Marilyn-Reed.jpg

Marilyn Reed is Diné, from the Cameron Chapter of the Navajo Nation, located in northern Arizona. She currently teaches at the tribal college. As a fluent speaker, Marilyn is committed to teaching the language to her family and community members. Marilyn is a participant in the American Indian Language Vitality Project  (NSF BSC #1601738).

Keren Rice

Keren Rice

Keren Rice is University Professor at the University of Toronto. She has been involved with research on Dene and other languages of the Dene language family since the 1970s and has worked with the Délı̨nę community over the years. She was the first director Indigenous Studies at the University of Toronto, and has been involved with Indigenous issues at the University of Toronto for many years. She is proud to have been honoured with an eagle feather for her contributions.

Crystal Richardson

 

Daisy Rosenblum

Daisy Rosenblum

Daisy Rosenblum teaches in the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program at the University of British Columbia, where her work focuses on the documentation and description of Indigenous languages of North America, with an emphasis on long-term partnerships that contribute to community-based language reclamation. She currently works with speakers, learners and teachers of Kʷak̓ʷala, a Wakashan language of British Columbia, to record language, develop curriculum, and steward it for today’s and tomorrow’s speakers. Before becoming a linguist, Daisy taught art and designed curriculum in public elementary schools, museums and libraries, coordinated Immigrant Artist Services at New York Foundation for the Arts, and worked as a shadow puppeteer.

Caroline Running Wolf

Caroline Running Wolf

Caroline Running Wolf, nee Old Coyote, is an enrolled member of the Apsáalooke Nation (Crow) in Montana, with a Swabian (German) mother and also Pikuni, Oglala, and Ho-Chunk heritage. Thanks to her genuine interest in people and their stories she is a multilingual Cultural Acclimation Artist dedicated to supporting Indigenous language and culture vitality. Together with her husband, Michael Running Wolf, they create virtual and augmented reality experiences to advocate for Native American voices, languages and cultures. Caroline has a Master’s degree in Native American Studies from Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. She is currently pursuing her PhD in anthropology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

Michael Running Wolf

Michael Running Wolf

Michael Running Wolf was raised in a rural village on the Northern Cheyenne reservation in Montana with intermittent water and electricity; naturally he now has a Master’s of Science in Computer Science. Though he is a published poet, he is a computer nerd at heart. His lifelong goal is to pursue endangered indigenous language revitalization using Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality (AR/VR) technology. He was raised with a grandmother who only spoke his tribal language, Cheyenne, which like many other indigenous languages is near extinction. By leveraging his degree in Computer Science and his technical skills, Michael hopes to strengthen the ecology of thought represented by indigenous languages through immersive technology.

Patricia Shaw

 

Ari Sherris

Ari Sherris

Ari Sherris is an Associate Professor of Bilingual Education at Texas A&M University-Kingsville.  During the 2015-16 academic year, he was a J. William Fulbright Scholar at the University of Education, Winneba, Ghana. During June 2019, Ari was a distinguished guest researcher at the University of South Africa. He is the co-recipient of the International Task-based Teaching (TBLT) 2019 Best Article Award for his workshops that blend TBLT with Indigenous language instruction. Ari holds a PhD in Second Language Development, an MA in Applied Linguistics, and a BA in the Humanities.  He is certified as an EFL and ESL teacher as well as a School Principal. Ari's research and language revitalization interests include Salish Ql'ispe, Safaliba and Simpa. His ethnographic work documents situated practice in grassroots policy initiatives and school-based activism among the Safaliba in rural Ghana.  His language documentation includes conceptual metaphors and formulaic language in Salish Ql'ispe. He also explores applications of task-based language teaching in the pedagogy of revitalization. His practitioner papers analyze integrated content and language instruction, academic English instruction for graduate students, and asset-based coaching for and by language teachers (e.g., peer coaching, critical friending in educational contexts).  Ari has planned and facilitated language and literacy workshops and lectures, as well as curriculum development, in Ghana, Israel, Italy, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sweden, Thailand, and the USA.

Sarah Shulist

Sarah Shulist

Sarah Shulist is an Associate Professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She is a linguistic anthropologist whose research focuses on the social and political dimensions of language revitalization, particularly in urban and multilingual settings. She uses collaborative ethnographic methodologies in order to support effective, community-based language planning, and has done ethnographic research in the Brazilian Amazon as well as in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Her book Transforming Indigeneity: Language Revitalization and Urbanization in the Brazilian Amazon was published in 2018 based on this ethnographic research. She earned her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Western Ontario in 2013. She has taught workshops and courses on Ethnographic Methods for Language Revitalization at CoLang in 2016 and 2018, as well as at the Canadian Indigenous Languages and Literacy Development Institute (CILLDI).

Cláudio da Silva

Claudio da Silva

Cláudio da Silva is a doctoral candidate in science of education at Porto University in Portugal. A native of Brazil, he is both a biologist and an educator, and has led a number of environmental education workshops for teachers in Brazil. In his work as a teacher at the Paulo Freire and Hiro Gakuen schools for Brazilian immigrant children in Japan, he developed a technique for interdisciplinary student research projects culminating in student productions of short books or educational videos. His work in Papua New Guinea facilitated the production of the first textbook about indigenous culture for schools in New Ireland Province. His current research focusses on techniques for the inclusion of indigenous and traditional knowledge and terminology in mainstream school curricula.

Wilson de Lima Silva

Wilson Silva

Wilson de Lima Silva is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Arizona. He is the director of the M.A. Program in Native American Languages & Linguistics (also known as NAMA). Wilson is originally from Manaus, Brazil. He is a field linguist with formal training in theoretical linguistics, language documentation & revitalization. Wilson conducts research in the Desano and Siriano (two Tukanoan languages spoken in the Vaupés Region of Brazil and Colombia). More recently, he began to collaborate in the documentation and maintenance of A'ingae (also known as Cofán), an isolate language spoken in Ecuador. Wilson is engaged in exploring new methodologies for endangered language documentation and revitalization/conservation, including the training of students and community members in research activities focusing on language revitalization and conservation.

Ha'alilio Solomon

Ha'alilio Solomon

Ha'alilio Solomon is an Instructor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa at the Hālau ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi ʻo Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language.  He is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in Linguistics. He is an avid translator for ‘ōlelo Hawaiʻi under Awaiaulu and Hoʻopulapula, and his studies involve language documentation and revitalization, as well as linguistic ideologies and attitudes surrounding ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. He speaks several other languages as well, and his multi-lingualism shapes his pedagogical approach as well as his academic endeavors, many of which involve the documentation of the languages spoken in Polynesia.

Nancy Steele

Nancy Steele

Nancy Steele has been a driving force for language revitalization all her adult life. After her MA work at Humboldt State University, she became the language coordinator at the university’s Indian Community Development Center, developing materials and curriculum and doing teacher training. She was also an early member of the Karuk Language Restoration Committee. She is one of the founders of the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, and one of the main designers and trainers of the Master-Apprentice Language Learning Program. She worked on the ever-popular pocketbook Now We are Learning …Karuk! and is a co-author of How to Keep Your Language Alive.

Kristine Stenzel

Kristine Stenzel

Kristine Stenzel lives and works in Brazil, where she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). Since 2000, her research has focused on the description, documentation, and analysis of Kotiria (Wanano) and Wa’ikhana (Piratapuyo), languages of the East Tukano family spoken in northwestern Amazonia. She has worked collaboratively with these language communities to organize extensive documentary archives, deposited at the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR/SOAS/University of London). The current documentation focus is on everyday life and interaction involving Kotiria and Wa’ikhana speakers to investigate grammatical structures and patterns of multilingual discourse from an interactional perspective. For nearly twenty years, she has worked in partnership with both language communities to develop language maintenance and revitalization resources, including practical orthographies, dictionaries, literacy materials, thematic books, and pedagogical grammars. Dr. Stenzel has participated as an instructor/facilitator for courses in InField 2008, and CoLang 2016, and she is a member of the CoLang Advisory Circle. 

Ryan Sullivant

Ryan Sullivant

Ryan Sullivant, PhD, is the language data curator at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America where he works directly with researchers to curate and prepare their data for archiving. For his linguistic research on Chá'knyá (Tataltepec Chatino) he collected, organized, and deposited language materials into AILLA, and has used other researchers’ archival materials in his own research. For AILLA, he researched the curation practices of many language archives and worked to improve access and reusability of collections as the project manager for National Science Foundation and National Endowment for the Humanities grants.

Alice Taff

Alice Taff

Alice Taff, PhD. works to foster Alaskan language continuity by engaging community members to document language, re-establish situations for language use, and create materials in their languages. Her current research interest is finding links between ancestral Indigenous language use and health. Adopted into the Tʼaḵdeintáan clan, her Tlingit name is L Jáaḵk. She is affiliated with the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau, and the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairanks, Alaska, USA. She has worked with Unangam Tunuu (Aleut, ale), Deg Xinag (Ingalik, ing), and Tlingit (tli) language communities to design, fund, and implement language documentation and revitalization efforts.

Allison Taylor-Adams

Allison Taylor-Adams

Allison Taylor-Adams is a PhD student in Linguistics at the University of Oregon. She earned a Master’s degree in Applied Linguistics in 2013 and participated in CoLang 2014 at University of Texas-Arlington and CoLang 2016 at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. Her research focuses on language revitalization, with special emphasis on methods and approaches for teaching less-commonly-taught languages, which led her to a term-length seminar in “Language Revitalization through Place-Based Learning”, taught at the UO in Spring 2016 by Janne Underriner, the director of the Northwest Indian Language Institute. She has published and presented on vocabulary learning, place-based teaching, and designing language documentation with teachers in mind. In addition to her work as a staff member at NILI, she has been a classroom instructor of English at UO’s American English Institute.

Adrienne Tsikewa

Adrienne Tsikewa

Adrienne Tsikewa, Zuni Pueblo, is currently a PhD student in Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is heavily involved with Natives4Linguistics, a collaborative project that promotes Indigenous needs and intellectual tools as ways of doing linguistic science. She currently serves as the convener for the newly formed Native4Linguistics Special Interest Group (under the Linguistic Society of America). She is also a current member of the CoLang Advisory Circle and co-facilitated the Life in Communities course in 2018. She earned an MA in Native American Languages and Linguistics (NAMA) from the University of Arizona in 2013. During her time at Arizona, she served as a Graduate Assistant for the American Indian Language Development Institute (AILDI). Her research interests include language documentation and description, language reclamation, language maintenance/revitalization, sociocultural and applied linguistics. 

Lance Twitchell

Lance Twitchell

Lance Twitchell carries the Tlingit names X̱’unei and Du Aaní Kawdinook, and the Haida name Ḵ’eijáakw. He lives in Juneau with his wife and bilingual children, and is from the Tlingit, Haida, and Yupʼik native nations. He speaks & studies the Tlingit language, and advocates for Indigenous language revitalization. He is an Associate Professor of Alaska Native Languages at the University of Alaska Southeast, has a Ph.D. in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language Revitalization from Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, and also is a Northwest Coast Artist, musician, and filmmaker.

Craig Alan Volker

Craig Alan Volker

Craig Alan Volker is an Adjunct Professor in the Language and Culture Research Centre of The Cairns Institute of James Cook University in Queensland, Australia. Resident in New Ireland Province, Papua New Guinea, he is a Wangpaang (Assistant Talking Chief) of the Sea Eagle Clan of the Nalik people of New Ireland. A graduate of the University of Montana, he was awarded a PhD in linguistics from the University of Hawai'i and was formerly Professor for Linguistic Research at Divine Word University in Papua New Guinea and Professor of Language at Gifu Shōtoku Gakuen University in Japan. He has a particular interest in the use of Papua New Guinean languages for modern purposes, such as formal education, books, films, and comics.

Kevin Martens Wong

Kevin Martens Wong

Kevin Martens Wong is a Singaporean teacher, novelist and linguist, and the founder and director of the Kodrah Kristang grassroots revitalization initiative (kodrahkristang.com) for the Kristang language in Singapore. Kevin and Kodrah have been featured on the BBC, AFP and elsewhere, and Kevin was the recipient of the 2017 President of Singapore's Volunteer and Philanthropy Award (Youth) and 2017 Lee Hsien Loong Award for Outstanding All-Round Achievement for his efforts to preserve Kristang in Singapore. Kevin is also the founder of Unravel: The Accessible Linguistics Magazine (unravellingmag.com), and has been a sitting member of the CoLang Advisory Circle since 2016, when he attended CoLang 2016 (U Alaska at Fairbanks) as a participant, going on to return as an instructor alongside Lisa Morgan Johnson for Creating Language Learning Apps for Endangered Languages with at CoLang 2018 (U Florida). Kevin graduated summa cum laude from the National University of Singapore (NUS) in July 2017 with a Bachelor’s degree in linguistics, also receiving the 2017 NUS Minerva Prize as the best graduating student in his cohort, and presently teaches at Eunoia Junior College in Singapore.

Dannii Yarbrough

Dannii Yarbrough

Dannii Yarbrough is currently pursuing her PhD in Linguistics at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. She is actively engaged in community-based material and curriculum design research with the Cuts Wood Blackfeet Immersion School and Native Teaching Aids, located in northwestern Montana. She is a collaborator on the Kaniʻāina: Voices of the Land audio archive and co-produces illustrated language lessons and animations for ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi language reclamation efforts. Her research focuses on community collaboration, decolonizing pedagogical approaches, and utilizing linguistic methods in materials development for language reclamation.