David Gates in the New Yorker

David Gates in the New Yorker

Note: Prof. David Gates reads at Second Wind with Pia Baur on Sunday, January 28, 6 pm @ VFW.

Gates' story, "Texas," is in the Jan. 15 issue of the New Yorker. He discusses "unsympathetic characters" in an interview with Deborah Treisman.

"After the children had left home and his wife had made her escape to Italy, Garver kept most of the house closed off, even when summer came and he no longer had to save on heat. Better the blank doors than the empty rooms—not to get sentimental at this late date. He still went to his studio every day, although the work was no good anymore, and “anymore” was putting it kindly. His married daughter, Emma, the only one of the kids who kept in touch, had flown up for his birthday and told him that this was no way to live. Look at the garden: sumacs ten feet high. He should sell this stupid farm and move back down to the city, she said. Or someplace where he could see people. Sixty-three wasn’t too old to make a fresh start."