Newsline February 12, 2018

Questions, comments, item to add? EMAIL us! Please note deadline for posts are on Fridays, and any attachments should be submitted in Word format. If you would like to be added to the mailing list, contact Laura. To keep up on other happenings in EVST, visit us on Facebook.

Table of Contents

Good News Item

  1. The European Union will only make trade deals with nations that ratify the Paris climate agreement

Around EVST

  1. Environmental Studies Summer Classessee webpage here
  2. Camas magazine has some exciting events planned for this spring semester.

Featured Events (See the Conservation Calendar for more events)

  1. UM Birthday Party! UC, Feb 13.

Volunteer Opportunities

  1. Montana section of American Water Works Assoc. and Montana Water Environment Assoc. May 16. 
  2. Help Big Sky Documentary Film Festival move towards zero waste; sign up now. 
  3. Science Fair judges needed March 19 (signup now)! 
  4. Concerned Scientists Happy Hour (Feb 22) and strategizing session (Feb 23).
  5. Get kids interested in careers in Environmental Science. 

Educational Opportunities

  1. 350 Montana Annual meeting, Feb 12.
  2. Wilderness Institute Presents ‘The Rivers Will Run Free’ Lecture Series, starts Feb 13.
  3. Public meeting on contamination investigation of closed pulp mill on the Clark Fork River, Feb 13 in Frenchtown.
  4. Ethical Valentine’s Day Bouquets workshop, Feb 13.
  5. "Wildness and the Anthropocene:  Notes from Montana”, Feb 14.
  6. Environmental Law Group at UM Law School hosting Earth Law Center's Directing Attorney Grant Wilson, Feb 14.
  7. "People's Hearing" on an expansion of the Rosebud Coal Mine, Feb 15.
  8. Native Trout Restoration in the Blackfoot River Watershed, Feb 15. 
  9. Systems Ecology Seminar, Feb 15.
  10. Big Sky Documentary Film Festival (Feb 16-25) winners announced; passes available now. 
  11. Five Valleys Seed Library's 4th Annual Seed Swap, Feb 17. 
  12. Black Solidarity Summit, Feb 17-18.
  13. Prose and Poetry of Bonner and the Lower Blackfoot, Feb 18.
  14. NATURALIST FIELD DAY on Winter Raptors, Feb 18.
  15. Call for applicants for Scientist Sentinels: Civic Engagement & Leadership Program, late May in Seattle, apply by Feb 20. 
  16. Environmental Education association offers EE Fellowship Program, apply by March 1.
  17. Permaculture Design Courses and Appropriate Technology Course (May, June, July), early bird pricing to end of Feb). 
  18. The W.A. Franke College of Forestry & Conservation is offering two field-based courses this summer.

Jobs and Internship (local or summer jobs; for non-local full time jobs around the US, click the envirojobs list serv, and request.)

  1. GRADS ONLY: ASUM hiring a sustainability coordinator, apply by Feb 16.
  2. MT NGO seeks aquatic programs coordinator, apply by March 15.
  3. Writing & Communications Services LLC (an EVST alum-run business) seeks part-time digital media manager for a conservation client.

Funding

  1. Funding for student research, apply by Feb 16.
  2. Funding & Fellowship for Public Interest Science efforts, apply by Feb 16 (grant) or March 2 (fellowship). 
  3. Wildlife Conservation Society Climate Adaption Fund, Feb 21 info session.
  4. Nominate a needed watershed/groundwater study for funding. 
  5. Funding for conservation/environmental studies/projects.

Housing

  1. Room w/bath for rent in nice, centrally located home.
  2. We are seeking a new housemate to fill a room in a 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house.

Miscellaneous - Resources

  1. Free screening of DARK MONEY opens 15th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, Feb 16.
  2. Tropicontra Dance, Feb 17.
  3. Montana’s Changing Climate—online resource.
  4. Article on UM Biostation’s Research & Action on Invasive Mussels.
  5. Montana Lake Book available as an e-book.
  6. Free Mediation Services for Farmers. 
  7. Leave it to the Beavers – Watershed Stewardship report.
  8. Bringing Back the Bull River video.
  9. Information on Safer Cleaning Products. 
  10. Newsletter of the MT-WY Plant Materials program (part of NRCS). 

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Good News Item

The European Union will only make trade deals with nations that ratify the Paris climate agreement.

EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström stated that a reference to the Paris agreement is needed in all EU trade agreements today. Read more here

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Around EVST

Environmental Studies Summer Classessee webpage here

Intro to Environmental Science: ENSC 105, 3 credits, Online. Instructor: Matthew Erickson. ENSC 105 builds skills in scientific literacy, critical thinking, research methods, and develops understanding of scientifically-informed active participation in social decisions and service. 

Watersheds and Communities Working Together: ENST 191 & ENST 591 (co-convened), 1 credit, Face to Face; Special: 2-Weekends, May 19-20, May 26-27 (SaSu 9am-1pm). Instructor: Laura Zanolli. ENST 191/591 covers basic watershed science, policy and community action. Students spend time on a nearby stream learning key assessment/monitoring protocols and interact with a local watershed group working on conservation-restoration-community engagement topics. ENST 191 is designed for local advanced high school students, lower division college students, and interested community members. The co-convened graduate section ENST 591 is designed for graduate students and high-school teachers. 

Music and the Natural World: ENST 391-02, 3 credits, (10 weeks), Face to Face MTWR 5pm-5:50pm, Instructor: Josh Davis. This class will cover the physics of sound, how music is organized in different cultures around the world, how animals use sound and song, how animal songs are organized, how human music and animal music are related, how natural sounds affect humans, and how human sounds affect the natural world. ENST 391 meets UD elective requirements for all EVST majors and minors. 

Where is Away: An Exploration of Waste: ENST 391, 3 credits, Session 2, Face to Face, MTWTh, 9:00 to 10:50 am. Instructor: Peter McDonough. The idea of “away” is pervasive in industrialized society: when we don’t want something, it goes “away.” But physically there is no such place, so what happens to those things? Explore the science, history, ethics, and economics of waste in this collaborative, inquiry-driven course, where Missoula is our classroom and trash is our homework. 

Summer PEAS Intensive Supervised Internship: ENST 396, 6 credits, Special: May 21-Aug 18, Face to Face, MTWR 8am-12pm and F 8am-1pm. Instructor: Josh Slotnick.

Students learn small scale sustainable vegetable farming in a hands-on work environment at the PEAS farm (15-minute bike ride from campus). Lectures, readings and reflection inform the work. Summer students also visit local farms on once-a-week field trips. 

U.S. Environmental Movement: ENST 420, 3 credits, Online, Instructor: Theresa Duncan.

Study of the American environmental movement as a social, political, and cultural movement. Examination of different approaches to environmental protection and restoration in view of the movement’s historical roots and contemporary debates.

Camas magazine has some exciting events planned for this spring semester.

One of these events is the Wild Mercy reading series, in which writers and listeners will gather at the UM FLAT to share in their enjoyment of environmental writing.  We are currently seeking student writers to read their creative work on the evenings of Feb. 1, 8, 22, and March 1.  The readings are planned for Thursday evenings, 6:30pm until approximately 7:30pm, inside the pellet-warmed UM FLAT Studio, from Feb. 1 to March 15. What you read (nonfiction/fiction/poetry) is up to you, but it should be your own creative work, and we'd appreciate it at least falling under very broad definitions of environmental or place-based writing. Typical timeframe is 15-30 minutes per reader (or roughly 8-20 pages of double-spaced prose). If you are interested in reading but are unavailable on the dates specified, please respond with your preferred date(s) and we may be able to shuffle things around. We will have 2 readers per night, with one night reserved for this semester's visiting writer, Richard Manning. Thanks in advance for helping continue this warm and important little tradition, and to those of you who have already agreed to read: thank you! 

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Featured Events

UM Birthday Party! UC, Feb 13.

Tuesday the 13th, the UC will host a FREE building wide student party from 4-7pm with Circus Club Silk performances, Big Sky breakout boxes/scavenger hunt/and Jewel Heist games, free food, carnival games, screen printing, photo booth, KBGA live music, outside firepit, UM Iceholes outside tents and ice fishing with hot cocoa, and fireworks on the Oval! Check out Facebook for more information. Big Sky Breakout Activity (Jewel Heist Breakout room scenario – team or individual). UM celebrates 125 years, Feb 15. UM President Seth Bodnar invites the campus and Missoula communities to celebrate the University’s 125th birthday during the annual Charter Day awards ceremony and reception at 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, in the George and Jane Dennison Theatre. This year’s ceremony coincides with Celebrate 125, which will feature a week’s worth of events commemorating UM’s 125th anniversary, including a birthday party encompassing the entire University Center. More information on Celebrate 125 is available here

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Volunteer Opportunities

Montana section of American Water Works Assoc. and Montana Water Environment Assoc. May 16. 

These are our professional managers of water, wastewater and stormwater.  They would like to hear your ideas on how to better manage these issues. You could do that by presenting a poster. The deadline for submission of abstracts for their Fresh Ideas Poster Contest has been extended to February 16. More information is available here. Please direct any questions to Keeley Barry, Chair

Help Big Sky Documentary Film Festival move towards zero waste; sign up now. 

The Big Sky Documentary Film Festival runs February 16-25, and this year the BSDFF organizers are stepping up their zero waste game! Read this week's Sustainable Missoula column to learn more, and sign up to be a Green Team volunteer today (click link and scroll down to find Green Team—note you’ll need a truck to haul recyclables). Volunteers get free passes and can attend some great environmental films like these: The Reluctant Radical; Keepers of the Future; Anote's Ark

Science Fair judges needed March 19 (signup now)! 

The 63rd Annual Montana Science Fair will be held at UM’s Adams Center, with judging on Monday, March 19. 250 judges are needed – so faculty and students in natural and social sciences are needed. There is training for new judges at 11 am (plus a free lunch); then judging occurs between noon and 6pm. Not all judges are needed for that entire period (some are just needed from 11 am to 2pm). Judging is valuable public service and it’s fun. You get to talk with kids from all across the state who are excited about science (often they are interested in environmental science). And you get a chance to help them figure out how to improve their study, and the next logical study they could do. If you are willing to be a Science Fair judge on March 19th, you can sign up on our website. New judges should attend orientation from 11:10 to 11:25 in the Adams Center Sky Club. Lunch for all is 11:30 to noon, followed by three rounds of judging: 

  *   Select "11 am to 2 pm" for orientation and first round judging (we need 250 judges for this round).
  *   Select "11 am to 4 pm" for 1st and 2nd round judging (a smaller group needed for this period).
  *   Select "11 am to 6 pm" for all phases of judging (only a few judges needed for this long). 

Concerned Scientists Happy Hour (Feb 22) and strategizing session (Feb 23).

Come to the Concerned Scientists’ Happy Hour on Thursday, Feb 22, cohosted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, Concerned Scientists of Montana, and 500 Women Scientists. Join your fellow scientists (social & natural) for a drink, a bite, and a chance to win a Got Science? t-shirt! We’ll also discuss the latest attacks on science and how people are taking action. WHEN/WHERE: Thursday, February 22; Time: 5:30 – 7:00 pm; at a downtown gathering place – see next week’s newsletter. Want to talk strategy? a strategy/brainstorming meeting for future science advocacy actions will be on the UM campus on Friday morning Feb 23; location available in next week’s newsletter. To facilitate group conversation, click this link to join the Montana Science Watchdogs google group - and post on the forums and send (and receive) emails to the group. 

Get kids interested in careers in Environmental Science. 

We Are Montana in the Classroom has received more requests for UM role models. For info or to sign up, contact Harley Fredriksen or 243-4828. February 23: Classroom visits with 4th-grade students in Polson - Share a hands-on or minds-on activity on a theme related to environmental science, climate science, biology, or computer science. Transportation provided; exact times to be arranged. March 8: Ronan Family Science Night - Share a hands-on science activity with Ronan K-12 students and their families at a lively community science night (5-8 pm). Transportation provided. March 7: Seeley-Swan High School Career Fair - Take part in a half-day career fair for high-school students. Lead a hands-on activity, share your experiences in your field, and answer students' questions about careers.  Depart Missoula around 7:30 am and return by 2 pm. 

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Educational Opportunities

350 Montana Annual meeting, Feb 12.

This is an opportunity for all paid up members (you can join that night) to vote on leadership for the coming year as well as hear about the campaigns we are working on. Food and beverages available from the Union Club bar downstairs. Monday, February 12, 5:30 pm, Union Hall (208 E. Main St.). 

Wilderness Institute Presents ‘The Rivers Will Run Free’ Lecture Series, starts Feb 13.

UM’s Wilderness Institute invites everyone to the Wilderness Lecture Series, held Tuesdays at 7 pm in Gallagher Business Building 123. This year’s series, “The Rivers Will Run Free,” celebrates the 50th anniversary of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, passed by Congress in 1968 to protect free-flowing portions of rivers across the U.S. Lectures below include two EVST alums:

Feb. 13 – “Wild and Scenic Rivers: An American Legacy” by Tim Palmer, author of 26 books about American rivers.

Feb. 20 – “Developing a Wild and Scenic Rivers Science Agenda” by Alan Watson, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Center.

Feb. 27 – “5,000 Miles of Wild and the One River Adventure,” by Mike Fiebig, American Rivers Northern Rockies associate director.

March 6 – “The Past, Present and Future of Wild Rivers Legislation” by Scott Bosse, American Rivers Northern Rockies director.

March 13 – “Rapids and Eddies of Wild and Scenic River Management” by Jimmy Gaudry, and Colter Pence, USFS.

March 20 – “The Political Ecology of Wild and Scenic: Advancing Resilient River Ecosystems” by Denielle Perry, Northern Arizona University.

April 3 – American Rivers will present one of their film selections for the 2018 Wild and Scenic Film Festival, along with producers of the film.

For more information, contact The Wilderness Institute, call at 406-243-5361, or visit the website here

Public meeting on contamination investigation of closed pulp mill on the Clark Fork River, Feb 13 in Frenchtown. 

A large pulp mill on the Clark Fork River near Frenchtown closed in 2010. Since then, there has been much discussion in the community concerning the need to list it as a Superfund site and clean it up. However, progress has been slow and community involvement difficult. Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks issued advisories not to eat certain fish in the area, and limit consumption of other fish. On Feb 13, the EPA and MT DEQ will hold a public meeting to provide an update on the contamination studies of the site, and the human health and ecological risk assessment. EPA and DEQ project managers along with EPA risk assessors will be available to answer questions. All those interested in the health of the river and its fisheries are encouraged to attend. WHEN/WHERE: February 13, 2018 7-8 pm at the Frenchtown Junior High School, 17620 Frenchtown Frontage Rd, Frenchtown, MT. 

Ethical Valentine’s Day Bouquets workshop, Feb 13.

MUD's first workshop of 2018-- Ethical Valentines Day Bouquets - encompasses our vision to educate, demonstrate, and celebrate urban sustainable living. Workshop instructor Melissa Lafontaine is the owner of Earth Within Flowers, a Missoula-based floral design and education business. Melissa's business sources locally grown, pesticide-free flowers as an earth friendly alternative to flower sourcing for weddings, events, and just because. This informative flower design class will offer a discussion of flower justice topics and the budding slow-flower movement. Attendees will create a locally-sourced, dried, bouquet that symbolizes love of the environment and local flower growers. Melissa will share design tricks, and the secret language of flowers and medicinal properties of the blooms. There will be refreshments. Follow this link to sign up early for our Valentines workshop to reserve your spot and receive the early-bird pricing! $20 for MUD members, $40 for nonmembers. WHEN/WHERE: Tuesday, February 13th from 6pm - 8pm @ the Home ReSource Community Room (right next to MUD!). 

"Wildness and the Anthropocene:  Notes from Montana”, Feb 14.

A presentation by Professor Christopher Preston, UM Philosophy. Free & Open to the Public. Refreshments. WHEN/WHERE: Wednesday Feb. 14, 2018, 4-5 pm; Dell Brown Room of Turner Hall, University of Montana Campus. 

Environmental Law Group at UM Law School hosting Earth Law Center's Directing Attorney Grant Wilson, Feb 14.

This Wednesday from 12:00 to 1:00 in the Pope Room (in the library) at the UM Law School. ELC works to transform the law to recognize and protect nature’s inherent rights to exist, thrive and evolve. Grant will discuss ELC’s legal initiatives, specifically his work on the Universal Declaration of River Rights and Local Ordinances that aim to adopt laws and policies that recognize the human right to a healthy environment and the environment’s own right to be healthy.  

"People's Hearing" on an expansion of the Rosebud Coal Mine, Feb 15.

Hosted by MEIC, Sierra Club and 350 Montana. DEQ has scheduled only one hearing in Colstrip. The People’s Hearing gives western MT folks a chance to speak. Thursday, February 15, 7 pm, Bitterroot Room at the Doubletree Inn. 

Native Trout Restoration in the Blackfoot River Watershed, Feb 15. 

Ryen Neudecker of Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited, will give a talk on restoring native trout populations in the Blackfoot River. Hosted by: UM Student Subunit of MT American Fisheries Society. Everyone welcome. WHEN/WHERE: Feb 15, 6-7pm at Forestry building 305. 

Systems Ecology Seminar, Feb 15.

This week’s speaker is Jeff Hicke from the University of Idaho speaking on 'Climate change and outbreaks of mountain pine beetle in the western US.' We will convene to the Dram Shop immediately after the seminar for THTH (Thirsty Thursday) so please join us - we had a great turnout last time - over 20 people - let's do it again! Jeff does some cutting edge work on modeling effects of climate change on forests and bark beetles - conversation promises to be interesting and lively. See you all Thursday! FOR 305, 3:30-4:20PM. 

Big Sky Documentary Film Festival (Feb 16-25) winners announced; passes available now. 

The Big Sky Film Institute (founded & maintained by EVST alums) announces the OFFICIAL SELECTIONS of the 15th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, screening February 16-25 in Missoula, Montana! 170 remarkable films from 40 nations around the globe explore visionary stories of humanity, activism, perseverance, innovation and a changing planet. View selections here. Passes available here. During the festival, the 2018 DocShop filmmaker’s forum will spotlight the intersection of film + technology. View the DocShop schedule and find passes to this exciting conference here.  

Five Valleys Seed Library's 4th Annual Seed Swap, Feb 17. 

Lots of FREE seeds for you to take home and if you have any to SHARE, please bring them! Info on gardening and seed saving. Kid friendly.​ More on Facebook. WHEN/WHERE: Feb. 17 - Sat. 10am-2pm at the Missoula Public Library, large meeting room, 301 E. Main, Missoula. TWO FREE TALKS: 11 am: Basic Seed Saving; Noon: Eat Your Weeds - Join herbalist Elaine Sheff from Green Path Herb School to explore growing/gathering your own healthy weeds and herbs in an ethical, sustainable manner.  

Black Solidarity Summit, Feb 17-18.

This February marks the 50th anniversary of UM’s Black Studies program, the third oldest program in the United States. With the theme: Reflecting on the Past, Preparing for the Future: Laying the Groundwork for the Next 50 Years, The Black Solidarity Summit will bring together representatives from Black Student Unions, African Student Associations, and Black Studies programs around the US to discuss issues vital to black students. Please visit the Black Solidarity Summit website for more details and information regarding the Summit. 

Prose and Poetry of Bonner and the Lower Blackfoot, Feb 18.

Bonner and the Lower Blackfoot have captured the imaginations of writers who recognize the unique nature of the area. This History Roundtable features excerpts from writers including Meriwether Lewis, Richard Hugo, Paul Zarzyski, John H. Toole, Norman Maclean, Michael Moon, Annick Smith, and others. Free admission. When/Where: Feb 18 at 2pm, St. Ann Catholic Church, 9015 Hwy 200 East, Bonner MT. Questions? Contact Minie Smith or call 406-544-0279. 

NATURALIST FIELD DAY on Winter Raptors, Feb 18.

Enjoy the beauty and majesty of Montana’s winter raptors while learning key identification techniques, anatomy, and behaviors. Denver Holt of the Owl Research Institute will lead our field experience in the Nine Pipes area. Cost:  $70/$80 MNHC members. Scholarships are available. Please call 327-0405 to find out more. Registration required. More info. WHEN/WHERE: February 18, 8 am to 4 pm. Meet at the Montana Natural History Center. 

Call for applicants for Scientist Sentinels: Civic Engagement & Leadership Program, late May in Seattle, apply by Feb 20. 

If you are a scientist eager to share the value of science, inspire your peers, and support evidence-based decision making, apply to Scientist Sentinels: Civic Engagement & Leadership Program. This program seeks passionate and dedicated natural and social scientists who want to become more effective leaders in communicating their science to decision-makers and the public. This 6-month program starts in May 2018 and provides a unique opportunity for 15 scientists and researchers to move beyond the basics of science communication to new levels of effective civic engagement and leadership.  Applications accepted until February 20; awardees notified by April 1. Successful applicants are expected to attend the three-day retreat May 29 - June 1, 2018 in Seattle, Washington. This retreat will be delivered by experts in science communication, policy engagement, and leadership from COMPASS and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Following the retreat, participants will have access to post-retreat webinars and peer coaching sessions for ongoing learning and support. Additional questions? Contact us here.  Apply today! 

Environmental Education association offers EE Fellowship Program, apply by March 1.

Want to create positive change in your local community? North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) offers the ee360 Community EE Fellowship! Prospective fellows will create an EE Action project concept as part of their application. Selected fellows will receive support from NAAEE and the ee360 team through professional development, resources, & networking opportunities. Additionally, fellows receive an all-expenses-paid leadership training (5 days) in summer 2018 and a scholarship to attend NAAEE 2018 annual meeting in Spokane, WA this October. Learn more about the benefits of becoming a fellow and apply by Thursday, March 1, 11:59 PM ET. Open to residents of North America. More information here

Permaculture Design Courses and Appropriate Technology Course (May, June, July), early bird pricing to end of Feb). 

Wheaton Labs, an experimental permaculture lab in a rural area west of Missoula will offer these courses this summer: Peasant permaculture design course PDC : May 22 - June 21, 2018; Homesteaders PDC: June 23 - July 7, 2018; ATC Appropriate Technology Course: July 9 - July 20, 2018. The courses are designed for hands-on learning. The Peasant PDC is for people low on funds but with plenty of time. Each day of this course involves four hours in the classroom and another four hours of hands-on project work (hence the discounted cost). The Homesteaders PDC is a standard, 14 day PDC geared toward serious homesteaders, but will also be deep enough for scientists, engineers, professionals and people with a great deal of study and practice with permaculture. The Appropriate Technology course will focus on water harvesting, solar technology, biochar, composting toilets and more. Some of you may know one of the instructors on the Peasant PDC - Lily Elison is a UM Geography student who won ASUM’s sustainability award last year. 

The W.A. Franke College of Forestry & Conservation is offering two field-based courses this summer.  

Alaska Field Studies - Explore Alaska’s rainforest on the edge of our continent! Spend three weeks participating in field studies and remote explorations of southeast Alaska’s natural history, political ecology, cultural history, and efforts to design sustainable economies across the Tongass National Forest. You'll sea kayak, learn about Leave No Trace ethics and learn how to plan expeditionary trips. Taught by Director of the Wilderness Institute Natalie Dawson. Open to all UM majors, undergrad or graduate students. Practice and Theory of Sustainable Ranching - supervised internship. Spend two weeks in the Blackfoot Valley herding cattle, monitoring pastures, learning about grizzly and wolf coexistence and exploring land ethics in the context of a working Montana ranch. Bandy Ranch is a 3,436-acre working cattle ranch managed by the W.A. Franke College of Forestry & Conservation. Taught by Bryce Andrews and Gillian Thornton. Open to all UM majors, undergrad or graduate students. More info here

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Jobs and Internships

GRADS ONLY: ASUM hiring a sustainability coordinator, apply by Feb 16.

The ASUM Sustainability Coordinator is responsible for promoting, developing, and implementing sustainability initiatives and activities at The University of Montana in collaboration with other UM sustainability staff. The Sustainability Coordinator will work with both students and members of the campus community and serve as a liaison between these two groups. The Sustainability Coordinator will be responsible for initiating educational outreach campaigns aimed at generating student involvement in the University's sustainability efforts. The Sustainability Coordinator must be a current graduate student at UM. Full job duties and qualifications were included in an earlier news Extra and are posted at EVST. Compensation:  $13/hr to work 15-20 hours per week for the remainder of the 2018 spring semester, as well as the 2018/19 academic year. Benefits include a $4500 scholarship per academic year to be applied to the coordinator's tuition. This position is supervised by the ASUM President. To Apply: Please submit a résumé, cover letter, and a list of 3 references to ASUM Sustainability (link) by Friday February 16, 2018. Please contact Meredith Repke, ASUM Sustainability Coordinator, with questions at the same address.

MT NGO seeks aquatic programs coordinator, apply by March 15.

Swan Valley Connections (SVC), a conservation and education nonprofit organization located in Condon, Montana, and an equal opportunity employer, seeks an Aquatic Programs Coordinator.  This position is a full time, year-round position to develop, coordinate, and/or implement SVC’s Native Fish, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS), and Water Quality programs and projects in coordination with SVC’s Conservation Director. Program area emphases include native fish research, monitoring and restoration, water quality restoration and monitoring, ecological studies, and AIS monitoring. full job description accessible here, or contact Rebecca Ramsey, Executive Director. Pay DOE. Resumes with references and letters of interest accepted until March 15. Note: some EVST’ers started this group. 

Writing & Communications Services LLC (an EVST alum-run business) seeks part-time digital media manager for a conservation client.

Learn more and apply here

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Funding 

Funding for student research, apply by Feb 16.

The Northwest Scientific Association (NWSA) is accepting applications for  2018 STUDENT RESEARCH GRANT Instructions_final.pdf. NWSA annually awards grants of up to $750 for undergraduate [BA/BS] and up to $1,500 for graduate proposals to support student research in the sciences.  This opportunity also helps you organize your research proposal, may add substance to your curriculum vitae CV, and potentially could get your study published in the peer-reviewed scientific quarterly, Northwest Science. More details here and at this webpage Student Grant Award. Deadline for submitting proposals is midnight on February 16, 2018. 

Funding & Fellowship for Public Interest Science efforts, apply by Feb 16 (grant) or March 2 (fellowship). 

Science for the Public Good Fund - Union of Concerned Scientists has a grant program offering scientists up to $1,000 for science advocacy actions or events. Apply to the Science for the Public Good Fund - by February 16. More info and how to Apply here. Science and Democracy Fellowship - Union of Concerned Scientists launched this Fellowship to support scientists in becoming local advocacy leaders. Approximately five fellows will be selected for the inaugural six-month program to mobilize their local communities, in partnership with UCS, in confronting federal attacks on science. Fellows will be given financial resources, leadership development opportunities, and advocacy tools to make sure federal policies—and policymakers—are using the best science. Fellowships run from May to November 2018, and fellows receive a $4,500 stipend, $1,000 grant for community actions or events, leadership development and training opportunities, and advocacy tools. Applications due by midnight eastern time on March 2, 2018. Info here. 

Wildlife Conservation Society Climate Adaption Fund, Feb 21 info session.

Climate change poses serious concerns for the conservation of biodiversity and natural resources. To incentivize new and innovative approaches to help wildlife and ecosystems respond to climate change, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation have created the WCS Climate Adaptation Fund. Between 2011 and 2017, the WCS Climate Adaptation Fund awarded more than $14 million to 78 adaptation projects across the United States. This WEBINAR will describe the goals of the Fund and the 2018 Request For Proposals (RFP), provide examples of forest adaptation projects supported by the Fund, and discuss tools and resources available to help forest managers prepare for the effects of a changing climate. Agenda and how to connect here. Date / Time: February 21, 2018 2:00 pm Eastern time, noon Mountain time. 

Nominate a needed watershed/groundwater study for funding. 

If you know of a groundwater study that would greatly aid in the management of a watershed, the MT Groundwater Investigation Program wants to hear about it. More info on the GWIP and how to nominate that study here: Ground-Water Investigation Program (GWIP)

Funding for conservation/environmental studies/projects.

Water Quality Mini-Grants, SWCDM MT Conservation Districts

Renewable Resource Grant and Loan Program, DNRC

Watershed Management Grants, DNRC

Montana Land Information Act (MLIA) Grant

Aquatic Invasive Species Grants

Robert & Toni Bader Charitable Foundation Grant

Jerry Metcalf Foundation Grant

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Housing 

Room w/bath for rent in nice, centrally located home.

If location, housing quality, and bike ability matter, look no further. Spacious room and bathroom in a comfortable, newer 3-bedroom house is available for rent March 1. Rent is $450/month plus a share of utilities. House is a warm, well-lit owner-occupied home, with two living areas, a nice kitchen, gas appliances, on-site laundry, hardwood floors, gear storage in garage, and a small yard with vegetable garden. Home is located between the Good Food Store and the Old Sawmill District. Month-to-month lease with option to sign a longer commitment available. Sorry, no pets. The owner is a male doctoral student and the other roommate a female natural resource specialist. This home is a great place for quiet relaxation or to enjoy dinner with friends. For questions or to schedule a showing, please contact Peter Metcalf at (406) 531 - 5098 or via email

We are seeking a new housemate to fill a room in a 4-bedroom, 3-bathroom house.

Located near the south side of the University by April 1st (available as early as March 15th). There's a beautiful backyard with a huge porch, small vegetable garden, and cottage for guests, plenty of storage/pantry space, and a badass kitten named Pierre. The ideal person would be planning to stay in Missoula for at least a year, and interested in living in a convivial, mature, & respectful household of grad students, PhD students, and nonprofit workers. Rent is currently $360/month. You can contact 2011 EVST grad Micah Sewell for photos and more info.

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Miscellaneous - Resources

Free screening of DARK MONEY opens 15th Annual Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, Feb 16.

A century ago corrupt money scarred Montana’s democracy and landscape, but Montanans voted to prohibit corporate campaign contributions. Today, after the Citizens United ruling, dark money floods elections nationwide, but Montanans are standing up to stop history from repeating itself in a struggle that has the potential to change the way elections happen nationwide. From Montana-born director Kimberly Reed, DARK MONEY spotlights the historical consequences of dark money’s influence in Montana, and the public servants, journalists and citizens that stood up to oppose corporate control of politics. Note, the Big Sky FF was started by EVST alums. FULL SCHEDULE OF FESTIVAL HERE. Opening night event, admission free and open to the public. Q&A with the filmmaker and panel discussion will follow the screening. WHEN/WHERE: Feb 16 at 7pm; The Wilma, 131 S. Higgins in Downtown Missoula. 

Tropicontra Dance, Feb 17.

Scientists agree – the climate is warming. Time to ADAPT and DANCE the TROPICONTRA! The UM Folklore Society invites you to take a bite out of winter, enjoy some tropical refreshments and Wear your grass skirts, coconut bras, sarongs, tropical shirts, swim suits/beach towels, pith helmets, fruity hats, leis, whatever. Live music; fun easy group dances are taught and called. If you can smile and walk at the same time, you can contra dance. $6 students. WHEN/WHERE: Feb 17 (Saturday), Beginners workshop at 7:30 pm, and the dance is 8-11pm at Missoula’s Union Hall (208 E. Main, upstairs) will be transformed into a tropical paradise (use your imagination). 

Montana’s Changing Climate—online resource.

MSU Academic Technology and Outreach and the Montana Institute on Ecosystems are excited to announce the release of "Montana's Changing Climate," an online educational module that allows users to explore the key sectors from the 2017 Montana Climate Assessment as well as learn more about general climate science. This free interactive module is self-paced and accessible to anyone with a personal computer and broadband Internet. Additionally, for $25 Montana teachers can earn Office of Public Instruction renewal units, or working professionals can earn Continuing Education Units.  Register for Module

Article on UM Biostation’s Research & Action on Invasive Mussels.

The most recent issue of UM's "Vision" magazine features a cover story about the Bio Station's invasive mussel research and early detection efforts. In 2017 the Bio Station and many local partners collected and analyzed several hundred environmental DNA samples from Flathead Lake, Whitefish Lake, Swan Lake, and an additional 40 or so lakes around western Montana. In 2017 there were NO detections of invasive mussels west of the Continental Divide in Montana! The Bio Station and partners will keep looking - being vigilant - and this spring the Bio Station will deploy new sensor technologies to assist with early detection efforts.  Read the article by clicking this link

Montana Lake Book available as an e-book.

The Montana Lake Book explains how lakes function, how they are threatened and how they can be protected. It also identifies simple actions we can all take to help protect and preserve the lakes of Montana. This 3rd edition was a collaborative effort of the Whitefish Lake Institute and the UM Biostation. Printed copies can be obtained from them, or an electronic version is available here.  

Free Mediation Services for Farmers. 

The Montana Department of Agriculture has started an Ag Mediation Program which provides farmers with free mediation services to help them negotiate with creditors. For more info, see Ag Mediation Website  and Watch Video

Leave it to the Beavers – Watershed Stewardship report.

The report is the work of the "Putting Beavers to Work for Watershed Resiliency and Restoration" collaborative, and it explores the role beavers can play in watershed resiliency and restoration. For additional information and resources on beaver ecology, research, and management and to view the report, check out the links below. Putting Beavers to Work and Beaver Survey. 

Bringing Back the Bull River video.

The Lower Clark Fork Watershed Group (LCFWG) has released an excellent video documenting a large-scale, multi-partner re-vegetation project along the banks of the Bull River. The video explains the complexities of large-scale projects, the partnerships, and the dedication it takes to make this type of project possible. Click on the link below to watch the video and learn more about the LCFWG. Watch Video here

Information on Safer Cleaning Products. 

Womens Voices for the Earth was started and continues to be maintained by EVST alums. WVE focuses on helping women protect their families from toxins through education and advocacy for safer projects. So what is your definition of “safe” when it comes to your health, your family, your pets, and the environment? And how do you know whether the company whose products you’re buying shares that definition? Recently, WVE released Health First: A Cleaning Products Industry Roadmap for Selecting Safer Chemicals and Inspiring Consumer Trust to address these questions. All companies claim their products are safe. But it’s clear each company has their own version of what that means. The Health First Roadmap offers a common language for industry, advocates, and consumers. And it lays out a path for companies to improve how they evaluate and select chemicals. Click here to learn more about what the Health First Roadmap means for you. 

Newsletter of the MT-WY Plant Materials program (part of NRCS). 

The Natural Resources Conservation Service maintains Plant Materials Centers around the US to develop plant materials to use for conservation purposes (erosion control, soil building, stream restoration, superfund remediation -- they try to use mainly native plants of the area).  There is a Plant Materials Center in Bridger MT, that developed some of the materials used in the Clark Fork superfund restoration work. Plant Materials Today is the USDA-NRCS Montana-Wyoming Plant Materials Program newsletter for those interested in plants and conservation. Did you know that the PMC cleans approximately 150 to 200 lots of wildland and increase seed each year! See our seed cleaning and safety tips in the newsletter. The Bridger Plant Materials Center 2017 Progress Report of Activities highlights the accomplishments of your PMC program including recently completed cover crop studies and the release of silverleaf phacelia for conservation plantings. Enjoy this brief summary of Plant Materials activities - with links to other useful documents.   

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This Newsline prepared by Vicki Watson and Laura Zanolli. Please send any comments to the Editor

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