Newsline January 1, 2018

Questions, comments, item to add? EMAIL us! Please note deadline for posts are on Fridays, and any attachments should be submitted in Word format. If you would like to be added to the mailing list, contact Laura. To keep up on other happenings in EVST, visit us on Facebook.

Table of Contents

Good News Item

  1. Campus Recreation works towards Carbon Neutrality.

Around EVST

  1. Professional Paper Presentation by EVST Grad Patrick Doyle.
  2. Free 6-month subscription to High Country News for students.

Featured Events (See the Conservation Calendar for more events)

Volunteer Opportunities

  1. Teach local students in the field on watershed conservation with the Clark Fork Coalition, Jan 4.
  2. City planning office accepting comments on proposed amendments to transportation plan, until Jan 15.
  3. Climate Smart Monthly Meetup—first one of 2018, Jan 4. 
  4. Invitation to develop a Tunnel of Oppression exhibit, proposals due Feb 1.
  5. Volunteer at the Russell Elementary School Science Fair, Jan 11 or Feb 23. 
  6. Missoula Speech and Debate Tournament needs Judges, Jan 12 or 13.
  7. Flathead National Forest plan FEIS open to objection for 60 days. 

Educational Opportunities

  1. The Agriculture and Water Governance Co-Lab, Spring Course offering.
  2. January trips and talks with Five Valleys Audubon. 
  3. Snowshoe Hike at Lee Creek, Jan 13.
  4. The Montana Natural History Center has a full schedule of community programs and events this January.
  5. How do you want Missoula to Develop? Workshop on development grants, Jan 9.
  6. Avalanche Class, Jan 16-17 & 21-22. 
  7. Avalanche Awareness Workshop, Jan 23, 25 & 28. 
  8. Growing Food Businesses workshop, Helena Jan 23, Hamilton March 1. 
  9. Western Montana Grazing and Agriculture Conference, Jan 24-26.
  10. Online course in Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management, Jan 10 to April 27. 
  11. Polar Bear Ecology Field Courses.
  12. Upcoming Sustainable Agriculture conferences and workshops (Jan, Feb).

Jobs and Internship (local or summer jobs; for non-local full time jobs around the US, click the envirojobs list serv, and request.)

  1. MT Dept. of Agriculture hiring a marketing intern, paid position for summer intern 2018.
  2. Montana Conservation Corps is hiring.
  3. Summer Internship Program (paid) on radiological and nuclear threats, apply by Jan 29.
  4. Summer Internship in Washington DC for Native American students, start application now. 
  5. Lewis and Clark County seeks Planner I.
  6. Paid Spring Internship with Community Food Ag Coalition (CFAC). 
  7. Summer Internship at YNP, Resource Management Internship for Native American students.
  8. Wilderness Ranger internship, apply by Feb 16.
  9. Naturalist Guides needed in Denali, summer 2018, apply by Jan 5. 
  10. Montana Conservation Corps is recruiting for summer 2018.

Funding

  1. Small grants from MT Native Plant Society, apply by Jan 31. 
  2. Scholarships for graduates working on fisheries, apply by April 1.
  3. Scholarships for students working on fisheries/habitat research, apply by Jan 5. 
  4. Graduate Student Policy Award Accepting Applications until Jan 10. 
  5. Funding for student research, apply by Feb 16.
  6. Research Fellowship for research in Rocky Mountain National Park.
  7. Research Fellowship for grads and undergrads to work in national parks, apply by Feb 19.
  8. Call for nominations for the 2018-2019 Bertha Morton Fellowships and Scholarships.

Housing

Miscellaneous - Resources

  1. You can support the March for Science (& get a cool t-shirt). 
  2. Nominate a Fishy person for an award by January 18. 
  3. Write an essay, win a restaurant in Woods Bay near Flathead Lake. 

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Good News Item

Campus Recreation works towards Carbon Neutrality.

Campus Recreation at UM plans to become carbon neutral in 2018 after purchasing 440 metric tons of carbon offsets and 870,000 kilowatt-hours in renewable energy certificates. The certified Green-e carbon offsets, purchased from Sterling Planet, will allow the department to cancel out nearly 1 million pounds of carbon dioxide. The purchase will offset the equivalent of annual carbon dioxide emissions from 49,492 gallons of gasoline consumed or 14,720 incandescent lamps switched to CFL light bulbs, as well as annual greenhouse gas emissions from 1.1 million miles driven by an average passenger vehicle or 153 tons of waste sent to a landfill. In addition to the carbon offsets, the renewable energy certificates, which guarantee that an equal amount of renewable wind energy is delivered to the nation’s electric grid, will offset the equivalent of 1.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide – or carbon dioxide emissions from 72,856 gallons of gasoline consumed or 21,669 incandescent lamps switched to CFLs, plus annual greenhouse gas emissions from 1.6 million miles driven by an average passenger car or 226 tons of waste sent to a landfill. Combined, the purchases will avoid releasing the equivalent of nearly 2.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide. Read more: Campus Recreation Furthers UM’s Commitment to Sustainability by Becoming Carbon Neutral

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Around EVST  

Professional Paper Presentation by EVST Grad Patrick Doyle.

Join EVST Graduate Student Patrick Doyle as his presents his Professional Paper, “Watershed Management: A Study of History, Field Work and GIS Analysis” on Thursday, January 4 at 10:00 am in JRH 204. 

Free 6-month subscription to High Country News for students.

High Country News is offering a special discount (FREE!) to students for a 6-month subscription. Please follow the details below to get your free copies today.

1) Send students to: High Country News Subscription.  
2) Scroll down to the "Student DIGITAL Subscription." NOTE: They will see a 1-year term and $25 price. If they follow the instructions in red, they will be able to change the price to zero and the term to one semester.
3) The student will first be asked to set up an account with user name and password.
4) Step two will bring them to the price page, here is where they will enter the code: HCNStudent. The price will change to zero after they fit the "Apply" button. 

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Featured Events  

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Volunteer Opportunities

Teach local students in the field on watershed conservation with the Clark Fork Coalition, Jan 4.

The Clark Fork Coalition is recruiting volunteers for their winter-time education program, Snow and Tell, that teaches local students about watershed conservation. Volunteer Orientation: Eat some pizza and learn how you can get involved in our winter education programs! When: Thursday, January 4th, 5:30pm. Where: Clark Fork Coalition Office, 140 S 4th St West. Who: Anyone who is interested in volunteering with the Clark Fork Coalition's education program (or looking for other volunteer opportunities in the future!). RSVP: to Katie or (406) 542-0539 ext. 212, or just show up! RSVP’ing will ensure that there is enough pizza for everyone, but feel free to just drop in too.  If you haven't done so already, please fill out a volunteer application.  

City planning office accepting comments on proposed amendments to transportation plan, until Jan 15. 

Missoula Metropolitan Planning is accepting comments on the city transportation plan amendments. One would add more funding to bike/pedestrian program planning, and the other would add more funding to the transportation program from the National Highway Freight Program. Comments accepted until Jan 15. More info on the amendments here. 

Climate Smart Monthly Meetup—first one of 2018, Jan 4. 

Meetup with your friends in Climate Smart Missoula & start planning actions for 2018. WHEN/WHERE:  Thursday January 4 from 5-7pm at Imagine Nation1151 W Broadway. 

Invitation to develop a Tunnel of Oppression exhibit, proposals due Feb 1.

UM is preparing for its eighth annual Tunnel of Oppression March 12-14, 2018. Tunnel of Oppression is an interactive event that strives to provide a hands-on experience of oppression. This event is designed to introduce participants to the concepts of oppression, privilege, and power, through a series of guided exhibits that educate and challenge participants to think more deeply. At the end of the tour, participants are invited to engage in a guided discussion and debrief to process their experiences. The Tunnel of Oppression committee is looking for student groups, campus departments or community organizations to construct and facilitate an interactive exhibit in this year’s tunnel. Below is a link to the proposal form if you are interested in putting together a room for this year’s Tunnel of Oppression. Please submit proposals by February 1 for the 2018 Tunnel of Oppression here. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact the Student Coordinator, Zaira Sanroman, or by calling 406-243-5776. 

Volunteer at the Russell Elementary School Science Fair, Jan 11 or Feb 23. 

UM faculty members and graduate students are invited to serve as judges for Russell Elementary's Science Fair on February 23 from 8:30 am until approximately 10:30 am. Additionally, judges are invited to help inspire Russell Elementary students about science and the science fair at an all-school assembly on January 11 at 9 am. Bring a short (~10 min), visually engaging demonstration and share why you are passionate about your research. UM faculty members and graduate students are invited to sign up for either or both of these opportunities. We Are Montana in the Classroom will provide transportation to Russell Elementary School and can purchase supplies for your activity. If you are interested in serving as a judge or sharing a demonstration, please contact Harley Fredriksen

Missoula Speech and Debate Tournament needs Judges, Jan 12 or 13.

Missoula’s annual Speech and Debate Tournament for area high schools will be held January 12th and 13th. All speech events will be held at Big Sky High School; debate events will all be at Sentinel. Debate & speech sessions are at 4, 6 & 8pm on Friday. On Saturday, sessions are at 8am, 10am, 12:30 pm, 2:30pm, 4pm, 6pm. We will offer a judge clinic on January 10 at 7 PM in the cafeteria at Sentinel High School. If you are willing to judge – click this link to Sign up here and pick a specific session. You will receive a confirmation email within the week.  

Flathead National Forest plan FEIS open to objection for 60 days. 

The Flathead National Forest has released the final environmental impact statement (EIS) and draft record of decision ROD for the Flathead National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (referred to as the “forest plan”). The revised forest plan provides direction for managing the forest’s ecological, social, and economic resources for the next 10 to 15 years. The Forest Service is concurrently amending the forest plans of the Helena-Lewis and Clark, Kootenai, and Lolo National Forests to incorporate habitat management direction for the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) grizzly bear population. The Flathead NF incorporates the NCDE grizzly bear habitat management direction as part of its plan revision process. The Forest Service has prepared a single FEIS for its forest plan and the forest plan amendments, a draft ROD for the revised forest plan, and a draft ROD for the forest plan amendments. A 60-day objection period started on December 14, 2017. The forest plan, amendments, final EIS, and other documentation are available at the following links for your review: Flathead National Forest’s plan revision webpage; Forest plan amendments webpage; and USDA Forest Service Northern Region’s species of conservation concern webpage.  

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Educational Opportunities

The Agriculture and Water Governance Co-Lab, Spring Course offering.

ENST 595-03 (CRN#39350) or NRSM 595, an 8 week - 1 credit course, is being offered Spring of 2018 by Professors Brian Chaffin, Society and Conservation and Neva Hassanein, Environmental Studies. In this collaborative lab experience (co-lab), students and faculty will jointly explore the development of research questions, approaches, and data analysis at the intersection of research on food production and the use and conservation of water resources. This co-lab is designed for students in the UM BRIDGES program, but will be open to any MS and PhD student, and will be geared specifically towards students in the early stages of research development who will in some way tie their research to an aspect of governing the agricultural-water nexus in Montana or the American West. The co-lab will meet 7 times for 80 minutes each (and once for 40 minutes) during spring semester 2018. These meetings will consist of a variety of activities, including but not limited to student-led, peer-reviewed paper review, interdisciplinary guest speakers, brief foundational presentations from co-lab faculty, and group writing/workshop exercises for peer-reviewed feedback on student research questions, abstracts, and proposal outlines. Students interested in this co-lab should come prepared to explore their own research questions at the food-water nexus, especially those questions with a focus on governance, management, and tradeoffs. For more information, contact Brian Chaffin or Neva Hassanein.   

January trips and talks with Five Valleys Audubon. 

Jan 8 (Monday) – A talk on the relationship between Clark’s Nutcracker & Whitebark Pine. 7pm in Gallagher room 123. Jan 13 (Saturday) – Owl trapping field trip with Denver Holt. Meet in NW corner of Adams Center parking lot at 9am. For more info, contact Larry 549-5632. Jan 20 (Saturday)—Bird walk at Metcalf wildlife refuge. 10am to noon. Meet at visitor center. 

Snowshoe Hike at Lee Creek, Jan 13.

Follow animal tracks through the woods on a moderate- strenuous snowshoe hike with a naturalist. You are sure to see something new and beautiful as we explore the winter landscape. Find out how snow levels effect the vegetation, which animals are the most active based on tracks sighted, and which creatures you might to look for at this time of year. Snowshoes provided. Meet at Lee Creek Campground. Cost: Free but Registration is required so email Christine Morris. WHEN/WHERE:  Saturday, January 13 from 12:30-3:30 pm, Lee Creek Campground. 

The Montana Natural History Center has a full schedule of community programs and events this January.

  • miniNaturalists PRE-K Program: Thursdays, January 4, 11, 18, 25; Time: 10:00 am-11:00 am.
  • SATURDAY KIDS’ ACTIVITY: Saturday, January 6; Time: 2:00-3:00 pm.
  • EVENING PROGRAM: Amazing Minerals - This four-part geology series is taught by Bruce Baty. Learn all about minerals with topics including luster, crystal shape and composition, how ores are processed and much more. Tuesdays, January 9-30th; Time: 7:00 pm. Cost:  $35/$30 MNHC members. Registration is required.
  • EVENING PROGRAM: Naturalist Trivia Night! Wednesday, January 10; Time: 7:00 pm; Cost: $5 suggested donation. BYOB.
  • EVENING PROGRAM: Understanding the Maintenance of Species Diversity in Western Montana Grasslands - John Maron, professor in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Montana will present a fascinating lecture describing his recent research in the Blackfoot Valley. Intact grasslands in western Montana support a rich diversity of native plant species.  A long-standing question in ecology concerns how this diversity is maintained. Wednesday, January 24; Time: 7:00 pm. Cost: $5 suggested donation, MNHC members and students free. All events held at the Montana Natural History Center at 120 Hickory St. Please visit the Montana Natural History Center link for more information. 

How do you want Missoula to Develop? Workshop on development grants, Jan 9.

The City of Missoula Office of Housing and Community Development will accept applications for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnerships Program. As part of this process, we want to hear from community members about their priorities for Missoula. Share your ideas, wishes and plans for projects in the areas of housing, economic development, public facilities/infrastructure and public services, which may be eligible for funding through the City of Missoula. City of Missoula CDBG and HOME Application Workshop: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 10:30am–12pm City of Missoula Council Chambers – Jack Reidy Conference Room 140 W Pine Street, Missoula. Any organization planning to apply for 2018 funds should attend; the public is also welcome. For more information contact us here or call (406) 552-6396. 

Avalanche Class, Jan 16-17 & 21-22. 

This class follows the Level 1 guidelines of the American Avalanche Association. There are two evening sessions and two full field days. The evening classes are from 5 to 8 p.m. on Jan. 16 and 17 in McGill Hall, Room 210 on the UM campus. Classes in the field will be held on Jan. 21 and 22. Cost: $275; Contact: Elizabeth Fricke, 406-243-5172;  EmailEvent website

Avalanche Awareness Workshop, Jan 23, 25 & 28. 

This workshop consists of two evening lectures, Tuesday and Thursday Jan. 23 and 25, and an optional field trip for skiers and snowboarders on Sunday, Jan. 28. The field trip costs $20. There is no registration fee for the evening lectures, and field trips will be organized at the end of the second lecture. Skiers or snowboarders attending the field session must be able to easily negotiate intermediate slopes. Must attend both lecture days to be eligible to participate in field day. WHEN/WHERE: Jan 23 & 25 at 6pm in UM’s North Underground Lecture Hall. 

Growing Food Businesses workshop, Helena Jan 23, Hamilton March 1. 

Alternative Energy Resource Organization offers workshops on growing your food business and operating under Montana’s Food Policy Modernization Law. Workshops are aimed at direct market farmers, health officials, local food non-profits, and folks with cottage food business ideas. The closest sites to Missoula are:  Helena, Jan 23 and Hamilton March 1. Workshops are 9:30 am to 3pm.   Workshops are free ($12 if you want lunch) and offered at a variety of sites and dates. Space is limited so register here

Western Montana Grazing and Agriculture Conference, Jan 24-26.

The conference will kick off with a free public talk by Dr. Fred Provenza of Utah State University on how crop and livestock rearing affects the health benefits these foods provide. WHEN/WHERE: Jan 24, 6:30 pm in UM’s North Underground Lecture Hall. The conference will continue Jan 25-26 at the DoubleTree with presentations on grazing management, soil health and testing, pollinator planting, real-life case studies, among many others. Missoula & Lake County Conservation Districts are the hosts. For info on agenda, cost, etc. check the website here.  

Online course in Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management, Jan 10 to April 27. 

This 15-week online course covers wetland and riparian ecology of the Rocky Mountain and Northern Great Plains as well as the regulations and public mandates that guide their management, and the human and global disturbances that continue to shape these systems. The course is designed to provide a clear interpretation of technical information to educators; tribal, state and local regulatory staff; and consultants; and anyone interested in these ecosystems. Fundamentals covered through guided readings and discussions of text book chapters, technical reports and manuals, and peer-reviewed literature. Cost: $500. More info & registration here. Course has been approved for Continuing Education Units at MSU.  

Polar Bear Ecology Field Courses.

Witness the Western Hudson Bay Polar Bear migration with the Great Bear Foundation. Each year, polar bears from all over Western Hudson Bay migrate to Churchill, Manitoba to wait for the sea ice to return after spending the summer on land. See polar bears and other wildlife in their natural habitat. Learn about ecology, culture, wildlife photography, and conservation. Credit available from UM! All proceeds benefit bear conservation. Sign up today and take advantage of the best travel fares! Courses offered:

Upcoming Sustainable Agriculture conferences and workshops (Jan, Feb).

Planning for On Farm Success: Helena, Havre, Plains, and Troy, Jan – Feb. The Montana Farmers' Union Women's Conference: Fairmont Hot Springs, Feb 23-25. 

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Jobs and Internships

MT Dept. of Agriculture hiring a marketing intern, paid position for summer intern 2018.

If you are passionate about local food and Montana Agriculture, can travel a little, would like to earn $12.00/hr, be flexible and work with people, then this may be a great internship for you. Please read more about the position and application details at this link. 

Montana Conservation Corps is hiring.

MCC is accepting applications for a variety of positions, ranging from leadership roles to entry-level positions. Work outdoors, make an impact, and have an adventure (with purpose!) at Montana Conservation Corps.  Click here to see what's available, and learn more about some of our openings. 

Summer Internship Program (paid) on radiological and nuclear threats, apply by Jan 29.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects at federal research facilities located across the country focused on helping DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts to radiological and nuclear threats.” This program will prepare a diverse, highly talented, educated, and skilled pool of scientists and engineers to address issues related to national security and nuclear detection and to enhance the future scientific and technical workforce. Undergraduate students receive a stipend of $600 per week for ten weeks plus reimbursement for travel expenses up to $1,000. Graduate students receive a stipend of $700 per week for ten weeks plus reimbursement for travel expenses up to $1,000. Research experiences are offered at: Federal labs in IL, CA, NM, NV, TN, WA. Areas of research: Engineering, computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, environmental science, and more. U.S. citizenship required. Application deadline: January 29, 2018, at 8:00 AM EST. How to Apply: Applications and supporting materials must be submitted here. Program Information: Detailed information about the internships can be found here. For information about DNDO visit us here. For questions please email us here

Summer Internship in Washington DC for Native American students, start application now. 

The Udall Internship national deadline is January 31, 2018. This is a great summer internship program in Washington DC for Native American students (undergraduates, graduate students or law students). This program does not require a nomination, but it is important for the students to contact Laure Drake ASAP for application coaching, or at (406) 243-6140. 

Lewis and Clark County seeks Planner I.

The Community Development and Planning Department is seeking applicants for the Planner I position. More information and application details can be found here. Application deadline January 7, 2018. 

Paid Spring Internship with Community Food Ag Coalition (CFAC). 

Want to help Montana’s beginning farmers grow successful, sustainable businesses?  Want to learn about how to develop new resources, plan educational opportunities, host events, and evaluate programs? CFAC is looking for an intern for this spring to assist with a range of projects, including: Promoting/marketing Farm Link Montana to farmers and ranchers and the people who work with them across the state (throughout the spring); Planning, promoting, administering, and evaluating a series of workshops in Missoula on legal, land access and business management topics relevant to farmers and ranchers (January – March); Supporting MSU Extension and small business staff across Montana in offering business planning workshops in their communities (January – March); Working with a range of farmers to collect reports and data from farm equipment investment project (January), and designing guides for project reports (throughout the spring); Planning and promoting a series of on-farm, farmer-led Field Days, covering production topics (offered over the summer, planning and promotion in March – May); Note: you will not be expected to lead these projects, but will have the opportunity to assist in development and management. As an intern, you will have the opportunity to assist with multiple projects. We can offer a $1,000 stipend to applicants able to offer at least 10 hours/week between January and May. To apply, email Dave at Farm Link with your resume and a note on the project(s) in which you’re interested and any additional relevant information not covered in your resume. We will be reviewing applications on a rolling basis with a planned intern start date of January 29th. 

Summer Internship at YNP, Resource Management Internship for Native American students.

UM College of Forestry worked with Yellowstone NP to create this internship program. Interns work with NPS employees and volunteers. The internship is fulltime 10-12 weeks, and housing is provided. This year’s internships are in: Resource Management Operations: work on a crew on hazard tree management, invasive plant control, wildlife/visitor management, data entry, and integrated pest management. Youth Work-based learning programs: Assist with YCC programs for 15-18 year old students. Intern assists with resource education lessons, weekend recreation outings, such as hiking, rafting, fishing; and mentoring students. More information can be found here. Native American undergraduates and graduate students from all majors are encouraged to apply. To apply, submit by Feb 1, 2018: resume; unofficial college transcript; cover letter explaining why you want to intern at the park; one letter of recommendation (from faculty member, employer, etc.). Email your application to Jennifer Harrington or turn into Forestry room 101. More info: (406) 243-5561. 

Wilderness Ranger internship, apply by Feb 16.

The goals of the Selway Bitterroot (SBFC) Wilderness Ranger Intern (WRI) program are to train, educate, mentor and provide employment development opportunities for the next generations of wilderness professionals and provide skilled support to the Forest Service for accomplishing priority wilderness work. This is a 14-week internship for military veterans and college students doing under-graduate or graduate work in conservation, resource management, wilderness, recreation or related fields. The internship offers 2 full weeks of wilderness skills training—crosscut saw use and certification, hand tool use, stock handling and packing, Leave No Trace and Wilderness First Responder training, followed by 12 weeks working in the Selway-Bitterroot and Frank Church Wilderness areas, with trained wilderness professionals, US Forest Service managers and volunteers. The intern will also learn about the Wilderness Act and how it established a framework for wilderness stewardship, what wilderness character is and how to conduct wilderness character monitoring. In 2018, interns will receive an AmeriCorps award. The application will close on February 16, 2018 at 5pm MST. More info & application here

Naturalist Guides needed in Denali, summer 2018, apply by Jan 5. 

Camp Denali and North Face Lodge in Denali National Park, Alaska are looking for skilled and experienced Naturalist Guides for summer 2018. Guides are responsible for: leading lodge guests into the trail-less backcountry of Denali National Park; using creative teaching techniques to expand the guests’ knowledge of Alaskan ecosystems and to encourage land stewardship; and safely transporting people over the unpaved, mountainous park road. Current WFR and CPR certifications and a solid academic background in natural sciences required (MS preferred). Experience in arctic/sub-arctic or alpine regions desired. This is a rewarding and challenging position, set in an unparalleled location, among an interesting, committed, and conservation-minded community.  For over 60 years, Camp Denali and North Face Lodge have been family-owned and -operated lodges with a reputation for excellence. A three-season commitment is required. Applications are due January 5, 2018.  Early applications are encouraged with interviews beginning early December. For more information or to apply, please visit the website or contact us here.  

Montana Conservation Corps is recruiting for summer 2018.

Whether you're...A military veteran looking for a new way to serve (see  Veterans Green Corps program!) An experienced leader who loves working with youth (see Youth Program Leader positions!) A college student/recent grad looking for professional experience in a conservation field (Conservation Intern program!) Just looking to dip your toe in the world of conservation service (see Crew Member position – application available December 18!) ...there is a place for you in the MCC. Every position receives extensive outdoor and leadership training, a living stipend, and an AmeriCorps education award that can be used for past or future education costs. There are serviceships available to assist with some of the financial costs! Help care for public lands by applying today!   

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Funding  

Small grants from MT Native Plant Society, apply by Jan 31. 

Each year the Montana Native Plant Society offers Small Grants up to $1500 each. The purpose of the MNPS Small Grants Program is to stimulate research, conservation, and educational activities that help foster an appreciation for Montana's native plants and plant communities. These grants are intended to promote native plant conservation through better understanding of our native flora and the factors affecting their survival. Proposals are due by January 31, 2018. The “competition” is open to anyone. Project eligibility criteria and submission requirements can be found here. Previous successful projects are also there. This program helped fund the native plant garden at PEAS farm. 

Scholarships for graduates working on fisheries, apply by April 1.

The Eugene Maughan Graduate Student Scholarship (offered by American Fisheries Society) provides up to $5,000 annually to masters or doctoral students working in fisheries science. One to three students are chosen each year to split the scholarship funds. In addition, students applying for this scholarship are automatically considered for another scholarship – the Trachtenberg scholarship (also called Sustainable Fisheries Foundation scholarship) which provides up to $600 to one student. Full details on these scholarships & how to apply are found here

Scholarships for students working on fisheries/habitat research, apply by Jan 5. 

Wally McClure was an outstanding advocate and leader for conservation of Montana’s aquatic resources. To continue his legacy and promote educational opportunities for fisheries students in Montana, the Montana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society established an annual scholarship in his name for undergraduate and graduate fisheries students. Two Scholarships are offered each year (The graduate award is $1,250 and the undergraduate is $750). Please submit applications no later than January 5, 2018. The McClure Scholarships will be awarded to individuals pursuing a graduate or undergraduate degree in aquatic natural resources from a University/College in Montana. Obviously, you can be working on aquatic natural resources within EVST. Click here to apply now. 

Graduate Student Policy Award Accepting Applications until Jan 10. 

Calling all Grad Students interested in policy for science and science for policy -The Ecological Society of America is now accepting applications for its 2018 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training and meetings with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Visit the ESA website for more information and details on application requirements. The deadline to apply is January 10.  

Funding for student research, apply by Feb 16.

The Northwest Scientific Association (NWSA) is accepting applications for the 2018 Student Research Grant (pdf of instructions at this link). NWSA annually awards grants of up to $750 for undergraduate [BA/BS] and up to $1,500 for graduate proposals to support student research in the sciences. This opportunity also helps you organize your research proposal, may add substance to your curriculum vitae CV, and potentially could get your study published in the peer-reviewed scientific quarterly, Northwest Science. More details at Northwest Science and the webpage Student Grant Award. Deadline for submitting proposals is midnight on February 16, 2018. 

Research Fellowship for research in Rocky Mountain National Park.

The Rocky Mountain Conservancy and Rocky Mountain National Park are requesting proposals for The Bailey Research Fellowship. This is an opportunity for one graduate level student to spend three to four months conducting research in Rocky Mountain National Park. Job Description: This fellowship opportunity invites a broad range of research proposals to be reviewed and conducted in Rocky Mountain National Park, including wildlife management, vegetation and riparian studies, fire ecology, cultural sciences, archaeology and historic structures preservation, as well as other topics in botany, zoology, geology, history, ecology and ornithology. The graduate student awarded the Research Fellowship will work with Rocky Mountain National Park staff for a period of three to four months. Applicants must submit a preliminary research proposal and the chosen fellow will be expected to convey research finding to the general public as well as to professional audiences. Wage/Salary: Housing plus a $8,000 honorarium and a $3,000 support budget for incidentals. Application Instructions: Please email a cover letter, resume, transcripts, and research proposal to Rachel Balduzzi. By February 1, 2018 for consideration of this fellowship. 

Research Fellowship for grads and undergrads to work in national parks, apply by Feb 19.

Applications are now being accepted for the Glacier National Park Conservancy - Jerry O'Neal Research Fellowship for work in Glacier National Park, Grant-Kohrs Ranch NHS, and Little Bighorn Battlefield NM. The fellowship aims to provide educational assistance for students seeking to understand natural and cultural resources issues and how these interact with human values. Special consideration will be given to proposals that clearly address the following: natural resource issues ecology of fire, land & water systems, invasive plants, and climate change; cultural resource issues, (history, architecture, cultural landscape reports, ethnographic research, archeology); social science that informs resource management about natural or cultural topics, visitor impacts). Who may apply: graduate students & outstanding upper division undergraduate students. Awards range from $1000-5000. Applications must be submitted electronically by February 19, 2018. More info and application instructions here.   

Call for nominations for the 2018-2019 Bertha Morton Fellowships and Scholarships.

The Bertha Morton Scholarship application process will be part of the University of Montana general scholarship application. Kelly Speer, the Graduate School’s manager, will be available to faculty and graduate students if there are any questions or if anyone needs assistance. You can contact Kelly at 406-243-2701 or by e-mail. All graduate students are invited to apply for consideration as a Bertha Morton nominee. All applications are due by 4:30 p.m. on Friday, February 2nd, 2018. Following are the instructions for students who are interested in applying to their department as a Bertha Morton nominee: 

  • Complete the University of Montana general application available at: http://www.umt.edu/finaid/scholarships/um-scholarship-portal/default.php.  You will then be able to select the Bertha Morton opportunity.
  • Upload a personal statement describing why you would be the best candidate to receive an award. (500-word limit)
  • Upload a statement of honors and awards, certifications, research, etc. (List these qualifications in order of significance, starting with the most significant) *A student who previously received a Bertha Morton award and seeks an additional nomination can only claim accomplishments not specified on the awarded application.
  • Faculty in the departments and schools will review the submitted applications and choose which applicant(s) to nominate based on the number allowed by the Graduate School which is based on enrollment numbers. The department will then submit a letter of nomination for their selected applicants.
  • The Graduate Council will evaluate and rank all nominations for scholarship or fellowship awards. Nomination documentation and recommendations should be based on the student’s academic record and accomplishments in one or more of the following areas:
    • Honors and awards
      Professional certifications and credentials
      c. Evidence of research and other academic achievements
      d. Evidence of professional and community achievements
      e. Additional achievements and creative activities
  • All candidates will be notified no later than April 13thregarding the status of the application.

Bertha Morton was a Helena, Montana native who worked most of her adult life for the Internal Revenue Service in Helena. She was not an alumnus of The University of Montana, nor did she actually attend any university. She worked hard and saved her money. When she died in 1977, she left a large part of her estate to the UM Foundation because she desired to encourage and help serious students obtain an education here. Bertha Morton fellowships and scholarships have subsequently become our most prestigious awards for graduate students.

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Housing  

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Miscellaneous - Resources

You can support the March for Science (& get a cool t-shirt). 

The folks who organized the million-person March for Science (including some EVST faculty), continue to advocate for science-based decision making. You can support this effort and get a cool “Catalyst for Change” t-shirt. Check it out here.  

Nominate a Fishy person for an award by January 18. 

The Montana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society invites folks to nominate fish conservationists in the following categories: Natural Resource Professional; Outstanding Fishery Professional; Outdoor Writers or Reporters; Educators; Landowners; Groups, Organizations or other Individuals; Career Achievement. Send letters of nomination to Adam Sepulveda at the USGS.  Just explain why this person is worthy of being recognized for their efforts to restore and conserve our native fish. 

Write an essay, win a restaurant in Woods Bay near Flathead Lake. 

According to this article in the Missoulian, someone with a well-worded dream and a willingness to risk $150 will be the next owner of a popular restaurant near Flathead Lake this summer. The owners want to pass the restaurant on to someone who loves cooking and people. And they are hoping that about 3000 people will send in their essays (plus $150). That will cover the cost of the restaurant, and the best essay writer will get the restaurant. More here. To learn more about the essay contest, go to the Woods Bay Grill website.  

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This Newsline prepared by Vicki Watson and Laura Zanolli. Please send any comments to the Editor. 

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