Newsline January 22, 2018

Questions, comments, item to add? EMAIL us! Please note deadline for posts are on Fridays, and any attachments should be submitted in Word format. If you would like to be added to the mailing list, contact Laura. To keep up on other happenings in EVST, visit us on Facebook.

Table of Contents

Good News Item

  1. Beavers, Otters, muskrat and mink get more protection.

Around EVST

  1. EVST alum offers stream restoration course at the American Fisheries Society meetings in Butte, Jan 29 - Feb 2.
  2. Study abroad opportunity in ecological restoration and bioregionalism (recommended by an EVST alum).

Featured Events (See the Conservation Calendar for more events)

  1. Western Montana Grazing and Agriculture Conference, Jan 24-26.

Volunteer Opportunities

  1. Missoula’s 12th annual Project Community Connect event, Jan 26. 
  2. Help launch Bitterroot Open Space Community Roundtable, Jan 27.
  3. Faith and Climate Action Montana meeting, Mon. January 29, 6-8pm at UCC.
  4. Judge Films for the International Wildlife Film Festival, Feb 5-6.
  5. Missoula Community Access TV meeting on Missoula’s future e-communication needs, Feb 6.
  6. Public comments sought on AIS rule for Flathead Basin; public hearing in Missoula Feb 6.
  7. Comment on upper Clark Fork fisheries enhancement plan by Feb 14. 
  8. Montana Farm to School Summit seeks presenters; summit will be Sept 13-14 at UM; proposals due March 31.

Educational Opportunities

  1. The following presentation and discussion panel on Scientific Integrity in Government is cancelled (???) due to the Government Shutdown.
  2. Reflections on 40-years of river ecology in the northern Rockies, Jan 24. 
  3. Understanding the Maintenance of Species Diversity in Western Montana Grasslands, Jan 24.
  4. Breeding Wheat Varieties for a Changing Climate, Jan 24. 
  5. Evening of short films on Working Dogs, Jan 29.
  6. Climate Smart’s monthly meetups start Feb 1. 
  7. Systems Ecology seminars start Feb 1. 
  8. Global Public Health lecture series this spring. 
  9. Spring course in Advanced Remote Sensing. 
  10. Clark Fork Watershed Restoration Education Program. Spring semester 2018, 2 credits, Fri 1-3pm.
  11. Study abroad offering on Water Resource Management & Sustainable Practices.
  12. Limited number of scholarships for graduate students to attend The Montana Water Summit, March 6 & 7.
  13. Earn college credit at Writing Workshops on Wild Water (literally), June 2018.
  14. Permaculture Design Courses and Appropriate Technology Courses offered near Missoula (May, June, July). 
  15. Backcounty environmental service program from July 23-aug 13, apply by April 27.

Jobs and Internship (local or summer jobs; for non-local full time jobs around the US, click the envirojobs list serv, and request.)

  1. Center for Sustainability seeks Sustainable Farming/Energy coordinator, Whitefish MT School District, apply by Jan 26.
  2. The Montana Historical Society Research Center announces the 2018 James H. Bradley Fellowship.
  3. Paid Summer Tech Positions to conduct pollinator surveys in North Dakota. 
  4. Paid Summer Internship in Alaska, apply by Jan 30.
  5. Intern with the Wilderness Institute on Lochsa River event, apply now. 
  6. Big Sky Herbs has Spring internships available.

Funding

Housing

Miscellaneous - Resources

  1. Missoula Business Women Network Symposium in Missoula, Jan 27. 
  2. How to get into full classes – process has changed!
  3. UM Physical Therapy Clinic Offers Free Consultations first week of classes.
  4. Local wildlife rehabilitator publishes book on environmental toxins impacts on wildlife.
  5. Video celebrates Montana land conservation heroes. 
  6. Aquatic Invasive Species workshop report and list serv
  7. Science magazine examines Climate change and the refugee crisis.
  8. Smart 911—a free service that may save a life.  
  9. Safety escorts available on-campus after dark.  

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Good News Item

Beavers, Otters, muskrat and mink get more protection.

As a result of a law suit, USDA’s Wildlife Services program has agreed to stop killing Oregon's beavers, river otters, muskrats and mink. Wildlife Services also promised to work under the Endangered Species Act to analyze the program's effect on endangered fish like salmon and steelhead. Despite the fact that beavers benefit these fish, in 2016 Wildlife Services killed 400 beavers. Read more in USA TODAY

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Around EVST  

EVST alum offers stream restoration course at the American Fisheries Society meetings in Butte, Jan 29-Feb 2.

EVST alum Mike Sanctuary and Ty Traxler with Confluence Consulting, Inc. from Bozeman, MT will team teach a continuing education course in stream restoration at the American Fisheries Society meeting in Butte (which is Jan 29-Feb 2. Mike is a biologist and Ty is an engineer and will be offer those perspectives to their approach to restoration. The morning course will run from 8:00 - 12:00 and the afternoon mine tour will run from 13:30 to 16:30. Transportation to the mine will be provided.  The course is open to the first 50 individuals to sign up. Sign up can be completed on the Eventbrite website. Info on the meetings here: American Fisheries Society (MT Chapter) annual meeting (link). at the Copper King Hotel, in Butte. Jan 29-Feb 2. 

Study abroad opportunity in ecological restoration and bioregionalism (recommended by an EVST alum).

EVST alum Laura Weingartner interned with Planet Drum Ecuador in 2015, and highly recommends the experience. Planet Drum Ecuador is an organization that focuses on ecological restoration and bioregionalism. They have a study abroad program open to professors and a group of their students. Here’s an example: Ten University of Oregon students and their professor spent ten days in Ecuador. They divided their time between classes with required reading, field practices directly related to Planet Drum's ecological projects, Spanish lessons, and field trips to local points of cultural interest. This is an excellent opportunity to combine academic theory with hands-on ecological restoration experience, bioregional education practices and service-learning work with local communities. More information on Planet Drum Ecuador’s web page.

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Featured Events

Western Montana Grazing and Agriculture Conference, Jan 24-26.

The conference will kick off with a FREE public talk at UM by Dr. Fred Provenza of Utah State University on how crop and livestock rearing affect the health benefits these foods provide (EVST is a co-sponsor of that talk). WHEN/WHERE: Jan 24, 6:30 pm in UM’s North Underground Lecture Hall. The conference will continue Jan 25-26 at the DoubleTree with presentations on grazing management, soil health and testing, pollinator planting, real-life case studies, among many others. Missoula & Lake County Conservation Districts are the hosts. Early registration is $50, and $75 at the door. The agenda of the conference is here. For other information check website here.  

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Volunteer Opportunities

Missoula’s 12th annual Project Community Connect event, Jan 26. 

Project Community Connect is a one-day, one-stop service event for Missoula’s homeless and others struggling financially. In 2017, thanks to over 300 volunteers & service providers, over 400 people obtained services including haircuts, food, clothing, blankets, medical/dental/mental health services, HIV/HCV testing and counseling, credit counseling, financial/legal advising, public benefits, employment and education aid, housing, family, senior and disability services. If you need the services, show up. If you’d like to volunteer to help, contact Anastasia at 406-532-6682. WHEN/WHERE: Jan 26 from 10am to 3pm at Zootown Church, 3623 Brooks. 

Help launch Bitterroot Open Space Community Roundtable, Jan 27.

This uniquely facilitated conference model invites everyone to participate. The agenda will be formed around topics of real interest and value to everyone who attends, and will be determined by the group that convenes around the open space. The title question is:  Nourish our Bitterroot- What If we envision our Food, Society, and Culture thriving and growing? Offered by Cultivating Connections, a project of Homestead Organics Farm, and the Center for Spiritual Living. Registration and Continental Breakfast 9-9:30. Program will start promptly at 9:30. Lunch as well as snacks, coffee, and tea will be provided.  There is no cost to attend and everyone who wants to participate is welcome to attend! RSVP at Eventbrite. WHEN/WHERE: Saturday, January 27, 9 am-4:30 pm, Center for Spiritual Living (328 Fairgrounds Road in Hamilton, across from the High School). 

Faith and Climate Action Montana meeting, Mon. January 29, 6-8pm at UCC.

Theme: Countering Despair: A Call to Community in Challenging Times. These days, hard news comes at us like ocean waves breaking on the beach...We no sooner recover from one wave (or not) and the next one hits. Many of us feel a sense of despair when confronted with the painful realities of a creation crying out in need of care and protection. Join us for an evening of sharing and reflection on ways that we as people of faith can address and overcome this despair. We’ll consider how a “call to community” can help us find new resources that lessen the weight of despair and strengthen the connections among us, empowering us to continue our work: to address the climate crisis and protect our planet. Event details at our Facebook page

Judge Films for the International Wildlife Film Festival, Feb 5-6.

Community Judging Takes Place February 5th and 6th, 9A - 4P at the Roxy Theater. Sign up here to volunteer. Lunch provided for all participants. Judges receive an All-Access Pass to IWFF (which is April 14-22). Community judges are an important and historic part of the IWFF selection process. 

Missoula Community Access TV meeting on Missoula’s future e-communication needs, Feb 6.

At the meeting, MCAT will explain how community members can assist MCAT and the City of Missoula in planning for the future cable and communications needs of our community during the upcoming Spectrum (Charter) franchise renewal process. Snacks provided. WHEN/WHERE: Tuesday, February 6, 3 pm, Missoula Public Library, large meeting room.  

Public comments sought on AIS rule for Flathead Basin; public hearing in Missoula Feb 6.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks invites public comment on a proposal to adopt a pilot program in the Flathead Basin to help prevent transportation and introduction of aquatic invasive species. The pilot program would require vessels and equipment traveling into the Flathead Basin that have been used on waters outside of the Basin to be inspected at a department inspection station prior to launch. Concerned persons may submit data, views or arguments here or orally or in writing at the hearings below. Comments can also be submitted by Feb 9 to: Tom Woolf, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, PO Box 200701, Helena, MT, 59620; or by email to Tom Woolf. The public hearings are set for Feb. 6 at the following locations: FWP Region 1 office, 490 North Meridian Rd., Kalispell, at 2 pm or at the FWP Region 2 office, 3201 Spurgin Rd., Missoula, at 2 pm. 

Comment on upper Clark Fork fisheries enhancement plan by Feb 14. 

MT Fish, Wildlife & Parks, and MT Natural Resource Damage Program request public comments on a fishery enhancement plan developed for the Upper Clark Fork River. The plan prioritizes specific areas for fish habitat restoration or protection. More information and access to the document here. Email your comments by Feb 14 to the Natural Resource Damage Program

Montana Farm to School Summit seeks presenters; summit will be Sept 13-14 at UM; proposals due March 31. 

This statewide conference invites proposals for workshops (50 minute) and Montana Food Talks (5 minute) sessions. Presentation topics include Procurement (for foodservice & producers), K-12 Education, Early Care & Education, Skill Building (e.g., social media strategies, fundraising). Proposals must be submitted online by March 31, 2018 at this link. Learn and share how schools and programs are connecting across Montana through the elements of farm to school--serving local foods, school gardens, and nutrition, agriculture, and food education. Workshops, field trips, and networking opportunities will provide inspiration, ideas, and resources. Encouraged to attend: school food service personnel, afterschool coordinators, teachers, administrators, preschool and childcare providers, parents, students, food producers, vendors, farm to school practitioners & supporters. For more information visit the link above or contact: Aubree Roth, Montana Farm to School Coordinator or (406) 994-5996. 

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Educational Opportunities

The following presentation and discussion panel on Scientific Integrity in Government is cancelled (???) due to the Government Shutdown.

But you can still use the links to find readings on the subject. The Forest Science Lab at UM invites everyone to hear Brendan Moynahan (link) from the National Park Service speak on “Scientific integrity and thinking beyond  ‘doing good science’”. Also invited to speak as a panel: Sonya Germann (DNRC’s Forest Management Bureaus Chief), Tom DeLuca (UM’s Dean of Forestry & Conservation), and Michael Schwartz (the Director of National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation) . Snacks provided. If you’d like to be thinking about this topic, check out: “Science’s Next Frontier? It’s Civic Engagement” blog and “Translational Ecology” in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. WHEN/WHERE: January 23 at NOON in room 204 of the Forestry Sciences Lab on the south side of campus (800 E Beckwith). 

Reflections on 40-years of river ecology in the northern Rockies, Jan 24. 

UM professor Ric Hauer speaks on "Reflections on 40-years of river ecology in the northern Rockies: Why rivers in the mountains are important and why you should care". WHEN/WHERE: Wednesday, January 24th, 4 pm - 4:50 pm, ISB 110. 

Understanding the Maintenance of Species Diversity in Western Montana Grasslands, Jan 24.

John Maron, professor UM biologist will describe his wildlife research in the Blackfoot Valley. Intact grasslands in western Montana support a rich diversity of native plant species. How can this diversity be maintained? WHEN/WHERE: Wednesday, January 24 at 7 pm at the Montana Natural History Center, 120 Hickory St. Cost: $5 suggested donation, MNHC members and students free. 

Breeding Wheat Varieties for a Changing Climate, Jan 24. 

Dr. Luther Talbert, MSU plant scientist, has been breeding spring wheat since 1988. His research is the leading supplier of spring wheat varieties in Montana, and focuses on developing tolerance to heat and drought stress. The talk will be at MSU but will be live screencast here

Evening of short films on Working Dogs, Jan 29.

An evening of short films followed by discussion and a demo by Working Dogs for Conservation. Jan 29 at 7pm at the Roxy Theater. Here are the films: The Thing About Dogs - beautiful film of companion dogs in New York City; Meet Piper, the Aviation Bird Dog - who protects the planes at Cherry Capital Airport from bird strikes; Sputnik-2 or: Laika, Our Hero -   In 1957, a Soviet street dog named Laika launched into space aboard Sputnik-2 and became the first animal to orbit the Earth; Leaders of the Pack - Photojournalist Katie Orlinsky, focuses on the everyday lives of people in extreme situations, and covers the 2016 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race; Shelter Me - celebrates shelter pets and the people who help them. 

Climate Smart’s monthly meetups start Feb 1. 

Climate Smart’s Monthly Meetups are the first Thursday of each month at Imagine Nation starting on Feb 1 with Energy Efficiency and Green Building. Learn about our new pilot weatherization program for manufactured homes, building energy "stretch" codes, and more. Come at 5pm to mingle, short program ~5.15. Check out the full meetup schedule for 2018 on Climate Smart’s website. WHEN/WHERE: First Thursdays, 5pm at Imagine Nation, 1151 W. Broadway. 

Systems Ecology seminars start Feb 1. 

UM’s Systems Ecology program seminars are Thursdays, 3:40-4:30pm in FOR 305. Everyone welcome to attend. Here are some of the early ones: Feb 1, Alan Tepley, UM Biology, Forest resilience to changing fire regimes; Feb 8, Zach Holden, USFS, Modeling topography of energy & water in the Northern Rockies; Feb 15, Nick Silverman, MT Climate office, Building riparian resiliency to climate change; Feb 22, Libby Metcalf, UM Forestry, Human dimensions of river restoration (Clark Fork River). 

Global Public Health lecture series this spring. 

The GPH Program in partnership with UM's Institute of Health and Humanities is hosting our 5th annual Spring Lecture Series. We have an excellent line-up of guest speakers drawn from health care professionals who work globally and locally to enhance public health. Information found here. The series is available for 1 credit (PSCI 191, CRN 38285) and is free and open to the public! WHEN/WHERE: Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm in Gallagher Business Bldg #123. 

Spring course in Advanced Remote Sensing.  

GPHY 595 ST: Advanced Remote Sensing (CRN 39426). This special topics class is designed for grad students and seniors working on research projects in remote sensing. Prerequisites: FOR 381 or GPHY 487/9 or similar classes. Each week a class member or guest will give a short overview of their recent research project, then the class will discuss. Unregistered students & staff are welcome to attend. For further information, please contact: Dr. Anna Klene. Information on this and other Geography courses can be found here. When/Where: Wed 4:00 - 4:50 pm, Stone Hall 217. 

Clark Fork Watershed Restoration Education Program. Spring semester 2018, 2 credits, Fri 1-3pm.

BIOB 491 – CRN 39433. This course is an integrative experience combining watershed science, history, biology, geology, chemistry, political science into a place-based science curriculum. You will help teach an innovative place-based science curriculum to 5th and 6th graders in Missoula County Public Schools and schools in the lower Clark Fork watershed. Enrollment by consent of instructor; contact Dalit Guscio. Please submit a cover letter and resume. 

Study abroad offering on Water Resource Management & Sustainable Practices.

The Green Program is a for-profit enterprise that provides study abroad opportunities focused on sustainable development. Their next offering is Water Resource Management & Sustainable Practices in Peru this spring and summer. More info on The Green Program and the Peru Program can be found at the links provided. This program is not affiliated with UM, so check them out carefully yourself. Ask to speak with some of their alums, or with faculty who have worked with them. Check out all the costs including travel insurance. If you decide to try out this opportunity, check on whether you can get UM credits. Caitlin is happy to answer questions.   

Limited number of scholarships for graduate students to attend The Montana Water Summit, March 6 & 7.

The Montana Water Summit is March 6-7, 2018 in Helena, MT and will foster a statewide conversation among folks involved in water research, management, policy, and practice – from legislators to landowners – to discuss some of the most-pressing current and future challenges with the state’s water quality and quantity. The Summit theme is “Water in a Changing West.” You can find information here. We’re offering scholarships to offset registration ($150) for a fixed number of graduate students – sponsored by the Montana Water Center. To apply for a scholarship, students should check out the website (above) and fill out the “scholarship application” at the bottom of the page. 

Earn college credit at Writing Workshops on Wild Water (literally), June 2018.

EVST alum Chandra Brown urges you to check out opportunities to Write on Wild Water offered by The Freeflow Institute. Sign up for UM credit (graduate or undergraduate). Two opportunities are offered: Salmon River Writing Retreat June 23-28 on Idaho’s Salmon River - a writing workshop led by William deBuys, Pulitzer finalist and a master of literary nonfiction. The 6-day workshop will be on the Salmon River, in the heart of Idaho’s Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Literature of Wild Journalism - June 12-17 on the Upper Missouri River - Hal Herring will host this 6-day exploration of journalistic storytelling in the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument. The first 4 days are spent paddling canoes through the Wild & Scenic Upper Missouri River. The final two days are in the American Prairie Reserve. Trip details, how to apply and register are linked from the course titles. 

Permaculture Design Courses and Appropriate Technology Courses offered near Missoula (May, June, July). 

Wheaton Labs, an experimental permaculture lab in a rural area west of Missoula will offer these courses this summer: Peasant permaculture design course PDC : May 22 - June 21, 2018; Homesteaders PDC: June 23 - July 7, 2018; ATC Appropriate Technology Course: July 9 - July 20, 2018. The courses are designed for hands-on learning. The Peasant PDC is for people low on funds but with plenty of time. Each day of this course involves four hours in the classroom and another four hours of hands-on project work (hence the discounted cost). The Homesteaders PDC is a standard, 14-day PDC geared toward serious homesteaders, but will also be deep enough for scientists, engineers, professionals and people with a great deal of study and practice with permaculture. The Appropriate Technology course will focus on water harvesting, solar technology, biochar, composting toilets and more. Some of you may know one of the instructors on the Peasant PDC, Lily Elison is a UM Geography student who won ASUM’s sustainability award last year. 

Backcounty environmental service program from July 23-aug 13, apply by April 27. 

Rocky Mountain Field Institute offers a 21-day backcountry environmental service program with college credit available through Univ. Colorado. Application deadline is April 27. Field site is in Willow Lake Basin in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 

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Jobs and Internships

Center for Sustainability seeks Sustainable Farming/Energy coordinator, Whitefish MT School District, apply by Jan 26.

Whitefish School District is hiring a full time Facilities and Ground Coordinator for their Center for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship. Application DEADLINE IS Friday (Jan 26th)! The start date is flexible and could accommodate students graduating this spring. Please let me know if you have any question; Ryder Delaloye or 406-471-0788. Link to Application & Job info here.

The Montana Historical Society Research Center announces the 2018 James H. Bradley Fellowship.

This fellowship is awarded annually to graduate students, faculty, and/or independent scholars pursuing research on Montana history.  Each Fellowship includes a stipend of $3,000. Each recipient is expected to be in residence conducting research for the equivalent of three weeks (approximately 90 hours) between June 1 and October 31. Fellows are expected to make use of the Montana Historical Society collections and to submit a written report upon completion of the research. Bradley Fellows also agree to submit an article based on the research for possible publication in the Society's quarterly journal, Montana The Magazine of Western History, within one year of their residency. Information and application can be found at James H. Bradley Fellowship

Paid Summer Tech Positions to conduct pollinator surveys in North Dakota. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-National Wildlife Refuge System-Habitat and Population Evaluation Team (HAPET) will hire 10 Biological Science Technicians to conduct pollinator surveys at various locations across North Dakota for the spring/summer 2018 field season. Candidates will determine presence and number of butterflies, collect bees along survey routes, and sample vegetation. Candidates also will collect additional biological information, enter data, and perform other duties as assigned. A great opportunity to experience the wildlife of the Northern Plains and to work with waterfowl and non-game biologists who are working to conserve wetland and grassland habitat in the region. QUALIFICATIONS: Preference given to those with butterfly and vegetation identification skills, or ability to learn. Applicants must be able to cope with stinging insects, heat, cold, wind, walking long distances, and carrying up to 50 lbs. In addition, technicians must be independent, pay attention to detail, responsible, and able to travel extensively on poor roads in isolated areas.  Work days long, with variable hours.  Valid driver’s license and good driving record required, and considerable time will be spent traveling.  Applicants must have excellent map reading skills and familiarity with word processing and spreadsheet software. Basic GIS and statistics background a plus. PAY: Pay at GS-4 or GS-5 level, depending on qualifications and experience. DURATION: Duties begin May 14 and continue through August. LOCATION: a leading landscape ecology and conservation GIS facility. Duty stations include Bismarck, Devils Lake, and Valley City, and several national wildlife refuges. TO APPLY & DEADLINE: These positions will be open on USAJobs week of Jan 22 and will be OPEN FOR ONLY 1 WEEK. More info: contact Neal D. Niemuth, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 701-355-8542. 

Paid Summer Internship in Alaska, apply by Jan 30.

Sitka Conservation Society is hiring an "Environmental Communications & Eco Advocacy Intern" for summer 2018 through Alaska Conservation Foundation's 2018 Ted Smith Conservation Internship Program. The position description can be found here. The application and eligibility requirements can be found here. All applications must be submitted through ACF. The deadline for submitting an application is January 30, 2018 at midnight Alaska time.  

Intern with the Wilderness Institute on Lochsa River event, apply now. 

The Wilderness Institute seeks a student intern (unpaid) to work as part of a team to plan, organize and, if available, assist in hosting a community event celebrating the 50thanniversary of the Lochsa Wild and Scenic River. This year’s annual Lochsa Madness Memorial Day whitewater boating event at Wilderness Gateway Campground on Highway 12 will include—tabling, speakers, film festival, and family programming—designed to educate rafters, kayakers, surfers, and onlookers about the values and benefits of the Lochsa River and the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The Lochsa River is one of only eight rivers originally designated by the 1968 Act. Intern works as part of a team that includes Forest Service and several river organizations.  If the intern is in Missoula during the event (May 26-28), s/he can help with the event. Intern duties could include: brainstorming, scheduling speakers, presenters, filmmakers, and kids activities; recruiting volunteers; designing/pricing printing and signage; procuring and organizing needed gear; organizing transportation and other logistics; contacting media. The team will work with the intern to select aspects for the intern to lead, based on interest and skills. Applicants with demonstrated experience in community engagement, event planning, and volunteer recruitment preferred. Send resume and cover letter detailing relevant experience and skills ASAP to Lisa Ronald. Call 406-396-3607 with questions or to learn more. Applicants must: Have an interest in community engagement and river protection; Be organized and detail-oriented and have refined communications skills; Be able to pace project work evenly throughout the spring semester; Possess excellent time and project management skills; Be able and excited about taking leadership to drive ideas forward; Have team experience and be able to attend all team meetings. 

Big Sky Herbs has Spring internships available.

You'll be starting seeds indoors, the greenhouse and the garden beds, as well as helping working more permaculture into this sustainable garden. Call or email for an interview 406-529-3714 or email Lori and see more on our website interns page.  

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Funding 

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Housing  

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Miscellaneous - Resources

Missoula Business Women Network Symposium in Missoula, Jan 27. 

Missoula Business Women Network offers this annual networking opportunity for women interested in starting and growing businesses. WHEN/WHERE: Jan 27 from 8am to 4pm at Hilton Garden Inn, Missoula. 

How to get into full classes – process has changed!

Note—the early ‘Wait list’ process disappears on the first day of class – today Monday! All waitlist notifications emailed to students are now expired. If you received a waitlist notice and did not register via CyberBear by 8am today, you must now obtain an override from the instructor. Faculty may sign paper override forms or use the online process. If you need assistance, please contact our office at (406)243-5600 or visit us in person at 201 Lommasson Center. 

UM Physical Therapy Clinic Offers Free Consultations first week of classes.

These free consultations normally cost $25, and are available to UM students, faculty and staff during the first week of spring semester, Monday through Friday, Jan. 22-26. Physical therapists at the clinic will answer questions about fitness and exercise and assess any pain or stiffness patients are feeling to determine if physical therapy could help. Consultations will take place at the clinic, located in Skaggs Building Room 129. Appointments may be scheduled at the UMPT Clinic by calling 406-243-4006. Walk-ins also are welcome. The clinic is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Local wildlife rehabilitator publishes book on environmental toxins impacts on wildlife.

Judy & Bob, wildlife biologists and rehabilitators living in the Bitterroot, began observing new birth defects and health issues in mammals and birds in western Montana the spring of 1995. They collected their observations into a book: Changing faces: the consequences of exposure to toxins. The book (available at Amazon.com) also provides evidence for the causes and correctives of these birth defects. This book is somewhat like "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson, but not as technical and has lots of photos and the stories of individual animals. In the process of rehabilitating wildlife, Judy discovered treatments that seemed to correct the defects. All profits from the book when purchased on Amazon goes to the Bitterroot Audubon Wildlife Rehabilitation Fund that pays for food and medicine for injured and orphaned wildlife cared for by rehabbers. 

Video celebrates Montana land conservation heroes. 

Five Valleys Land Trust invites you to enjoy this beautiful 20 minute film: On the Shoulders of Giants--Celebrating 40 years of conservation. Produced by filmmaker Eric Ian in association with the Montana Association of Land Trusts, the film tells the story of 40 years of private land conservation across Montana, and the people, land trusts, and communities that made it happen. 

Aquatic Invasive Species workshop report and list serv

With the recent discovery of exotic invasive mussels in eastern Montana reservoirs, there is great concern of their potential to spread across the continental divide into the headwaters of the Columbia, contaminating this last stronghold of native species. The Upper Columbia Conservation Commission UC3  was formed to address this threat. All meetings are open; interested citizens encouraged to attend. UC3 invites you to subscribe to their list serv so you will receive the latest news. To subscribe contact, Kate Wilson. UCS held a workshop on AIS monitoring & control measures in December. A summary of that workshop will be posted on the  UC3 website. The next Upper Columbia Conservation Commission meeting will be held January 24th from 9 AM – 5 PM at the Flathead Electric Coop (2510 Hwy 2, Kalispell). Flathead Basin AIS Rules – Public Comment invited at meetings coming Feb 6 in Kalispell and Missoula (or written comments accepted until Feb 9). More AIS RESOURCES found at these links: Montana’s AIS Program; Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes AIS Program; and the Flathead Lakers AIS Video ‘Be a Montana Superhero’. 

Science magazine examines Climate change and the refugee crisis.

A new study in Science magazine Examines the link between climate change and the refugee crisis, researchers found that when temperatures in agricultural areas vary too far from an “optimal” range, the number of people seeking asylum increases. Researchers also found that, if we fail to significantly reduce emissions and proceed with a “business-as-usual” climate scenario, asylum applications could double by the end of the century. 

Smart 911—a free service that may save a life.  

Missoula County offers Smart 911, a service focused on enhancing emergency response and preparedness where it is most needed. Smart 911 can send geo-targeted alerts to cell phones - useful for fires, flooding, and for finding missing children and others. You can also create a Safety Profile, containing vital medical and household information, that will pop-up on the emergency dispatcher’s computer screen when an emergency call comes in from a household. This saves time when saving time can save a life. Missoula County Emergency Management says this service is free, private, secure. To sign up, go to Smart 911

Safety escorts available on-campus after dark.  

Recently two men reportedly accosted a female student in the Music building. Be aware of your surroundings and call UM Police if you see anything suspicious (406-243-4000). If you want a walking or driving escort after dark, call Griz Walk (406-243-2277). If you experience unwanted physical, sexual, emotional or social coercion, call UM’s Student Advocacy Resource Center (SARC) (406-243-4429). The UM Title IX office responds to reports of discrimination and harassment, including sexual violence. For more information call (406-243-5700). 

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This Newsline prepared by Vicki Watson and Laura Zanolli. Please send any comments to the Editor

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