Spring 2021 Course Details


Ancient Rome | HSTR 304H

Course Photo for Ancient Rome Instructor: Scott Arcenas
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Remote
Days and times: MWF: 12:00 – 12:50pm

Course Description: In the year 500 BCE, Rome was a small, unremarkable village on the outskirts of the civilized world. Five hundred years later, Romans ruled the largest and most powerful empire the world had ever known. By 500 CE, however, Rome itself lay in ruins, and the empire had been reduced to a shadow of its former self. In this class, we will study the thousand years of Roman history 500 BCE – 500 CE, with particular attention to the questions of how the Romans rose to power, why Rome fell, and what we can learn from both the Romans’ triumphs and their mistakes.

Instructor Email: scott.arcenas@umontana.edu

Intoxication Nation: Alcohol in American History | HSTA 377

Course Photo for Intoxication Nation: Alcohol in American History Instructor: Kyle G. Volk
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MW: 2:00 – 3:20pm

Course Description: Booze, demon rum, hooch, poison, liquid courage, firewater. Whatever the preferred moniker, beverage alcohol has played a critical role in U.S. History. It fueled the American Revolution, funded the Union Army during the Civil War, and fortified U.S. troops who defeated the Nazis. Yet its consumption has also constituted one of the most major ethical dilemmas in American public life, prompting repeated anti-alcohol “reform” crusades, multiple attempts at legal prohibition, and key moments of wet backlash. This course explores the controversial history of alcohol beginning in the seventeenth century and ending in the recent past. It blends varied historical approaches to interrogate the manifold ways that alcohol has shaped the American nation and the everyday lives of its citizens.

Instructor Email: kyle.volk@umontana.edu

Women in America: Civil War to Present | HSTA 371H 01

Course Photo for Women in America: Civil War to Present Instructor: Anya Jabour
Credits: 3
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H)
Delivery Method: Online

Course Description: The 2016 presidential election ushered in a new era of women's activism, initiated with a massive Women's March on Washington. In the past four years, women have gained political office in record numbers. Women also have been at the forefront of ongoing social justice movements, including Black Lives Matter, Me Too, and MMIW (Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women). Today's activism owes its vitality to women's social and political activism over the past 150 years. Learn more in this course, which addresses major issues and events in women’s history in the United States from the Civil War to the present. This online course counts toward the “Historical and Cultural” perspective for General Education requirements and fulfills one of the “U.S.” courses required of history majors and minors. It also may be used toward a major or minor in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Instructor Email: anya.jabour@umontana.edu

American History II | HSTA 102HY 00

Course Photo for American History II Instructor: Michael Mayer
Credits: 4
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H) , Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MWF 10-10:50 -or- MWF 2-2:50

Course Description: This course is an introductory survey of United States history from 1877 to the present. It will acquaint you with some of the people, events, technologies, ideas, and choices that have shaped modern American history. Several overarching themes will guide our study: social conflict, economic consolidation, expansion of government function, the growth of consumerism and mass culture, America's rise as a global power, and diminishing social inequality. This class will also expose you to the practice of historical interpretation. You will not just read what others have written about the past; you will examine historical documents for yourself and be expected to articulate your own interpretation of them.

Instructor Email: michael.mayer@umontana.edu

American History II - Honors | HSTA 104HY 80

Course Photo for American History II - Honors Instructor: Michael Mayer
Credits: 4
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H) , Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MWF 10-10:50

Course Description: This course is an introductory survey of United States history from 1877 to the present. It will acquaint you with some of the people, events, technologies, ideas, and choices that have shaped modern American history. Several overarching themes will guide our study: social conflict, economic consolidation, expansion of government function, the growth of consumerism and mass culture, America's rise as a global power, and diminishing social inequality. This class will also expose you to the practice of historical interpretation. You will not just read what others have written about the past; you will examine historical documents for yourself and be expected to articulate your own interpretation of them.

Instructor Email: michael.mayer@umontana.edu

Digital Worlds of Early America | HSTA 391

Course Photo for Digital Worlds of Early America Instructor: Claire Arcenas
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: T/Th 9:30-10:50am

Course Description: This course will introduce students to the many ways digital and computing innovations have transformed what we know about early American history. Join us as we explore digital and spatial history approaches to answering historical questions about slavery, the Enlightenment, and the relationship between cartography and eighteenth-century empires! Fulfill your Intermediate Writing requirement and become a better, more confident writer!

Instructor Email: claire.arcenas@umontana.edu

Black Radical Tradition | HSTA 415 01

Course Photo for Black Radical Tradition Instructor: Tobin Shearer
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Remote
Days and times: TR 12:30-1:50

Course Description: Historians have generally framed African-American resistance to institutional, political, and cultural racism in the United States according to one of two strategies: the non-violent integrationist efforts of the Civil Rights Movement or the armed, revolutionary efforts of Black Nationalist groups like the Black Panthers. This dichotomy sets up a polar opposition that ignores the continuities within and seamless perspectives of the Black Radical tradition throughout American history. This course seeks to answer the question, “What are the sources, practices, and effects of the Black Radical tradition in the entirety of United States history?” From slave revolts through to the Move rebellion in Philadelphia, this course examines how the African-American community has engaged in radical efforts to change the status quo in the name of seeking racial justice.

Instructor Email: tobin.shearer@umontana.edu

Research in Montana History | HSTA 461 01

Course Photo for Research in Montana History Instructor: Jeff Wiltse
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: TR 12:30-1:50

Course Description: This course is a research seminar in Montana history. Students will learn advanced research methodology in history and become familiar with a variety of databases and source collections useful for researching Montana history. Students will research and write a twenty-page, primary-source based paper on a topic in Montana history. This course fulfills the Advanced Writing (AW) requirement for the history department and the university.

Instructor Email: jeff.wiltse@umontana.edu

Western Civilization II | HSTR 102HY 00

Course Photo for Western Civilization II Instructor: Robert Greene
Credits: 4
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H) , Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
Delivery Method: Online

Course Description: This course will introduce students to some of the major themes in Western Civilization from the eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth century and beyond. Particular topics to be examined include: the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and the emergence of political alternatives to absolutism; the Napoleonic age and its aftermath; the rise of romanticism; the changing face of liberalism; the emergence and appeal of socialism; the growth of nationalism and racial thinking; imperialism and colonization; urbanization and industrialization; modernity and cultures of anxiety; the First World War and the Bolshevik Revolution; communism and fascism; the Second World War and the Holocaust; European reconstruction and the beginnings of the Cold War; the fall of communism and the search for a new European consensus.

Instructor Email: robert.greene@umontana.edu

Western Civilization II - Honors | HSTR 104HY 80

Course Photo for Western Civilization II - Honors Instructor: Robert Greene
Credits: 4
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H) , Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
Delivery Method: Online
Days and times: MWF 9:00-9:50; F 11:00-11:50

Course Description: This course will introduce students to some of the major themes in Western Civilization from the eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth century and beyond. Particular topics to be examined include: the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and the emergence of political alternatives to absolutism; the Napoleonic age and its aftermath; the rise of romanticism; the changing face of liberalism; the emergence and appeal of socialism; the growth of nationalism and racial thinking; imperialism and colonization; urbanization and industrialization; modernity and cultures of anxiety; the First World War and the Bolshevik Revolution; communism and fascism; the Second World War and the Holocaust; European reconstruction and the beginnings of the Cold War; the fall of communism and the search for a new European consensus.

Instructor Email: robert.greene@umontana.edu

Introduction to Historical Methods | HSTR 200

Course Photo for Introduction to Historical Methods Instructor: Various Instructors
Credits: 1

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face

Course Description: The purpose of HSTR 200 is to acquaint you with the methods historians use to locate, analyze, and synthesize information about the past. In this course, you will learn how to locate and assess primary sources in Archives & Special Collections as well as in digitized format via databases of newspapers and other online repositories. You also will learn how to find and identify credible secondary sources, including scholarly articles in library databases. Finally, you will how to provide proper documentation for your research. You will put all these skills to use in a real-life local-history project that will acquaint you with the practice of public history and teach you some basics of digital history.

Additional Details: Section 01 | Professor Michael Mayer | W 2:00-2:50; Section 02 | Professor Robert Greene | M 11:00-11:50

Modern Latin America | HSTR 231HX 01

Course Photo for Modern Latin America Instructor: Jody Pavilack
Credits: 3
Gen Ed Attributes: Historical Studies (H)
Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: TR 11:00-12:20

Course Description: A study of “the other Americas” in the 19th and 20th centuries—from Mexico and the Caribbean islands through Central and South America. What views of the nation-state and models for development have gained ascendance in different places and times? How have collective movements challenged exclusion and oppression, from the Mexican and Cuban revolutions to the Zapatistas of the late 20th century? How have the elite tried to hold onto power? What role have the United States and other global powers played in Latin American history? This course counts for Gen Ed H & X, the Latin American Studies minor, the International Development Studies minor, and the History Department world course requirement.

Instructor Email: jody.pavilack@umontana.edu

Islamic Civilization: Modern Era | HSTR 264 01

Course Photo for Islamic Civilization: Modern Era Instructor: Mehrdad Kia
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: TR 2:00-3:20

Course Description: After a brief discussion of the life of the Prophet Muhammad, the teachings of Islam, and sketching the nineteenth century background (the disintegration and collapse of the Ottoman and Persian empires), this course will examine in greater detail, the political history of the Middle East and Central Asia since the beginning of the twentieth century. Special attention will be given to the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict, the struggle for the leadership in the Arab world, and the rise of Arab nationalism after the end of Second World War. The geographic emphasis will be on the Arab Middle East, but time permitting we will discuss the most important “hot spots” such as Afghanistan and the former Soviet Republics of Central Asia.

Instructor Email: mehrdad.kia@mso.umt.edu

Terrorism: Violence and the Modern World | HSTR 272E 01

Course Photo for Terrorism: Violence and the Modern World Instructor: Richard Drake
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MWF 11:00-12:20

Course Description: In its annual edition of Patterns of Global Terrorism, the United States Department of State has acknowledged that “No one definition of terrorism has gained universal acceptance.” The term poses serious semantic difficulties. Terrorism is generally held to be political violence that is illegitimate, but what confers legitimacy on some acts of political violence and illegitimacy on others? Is terrorism simply the name we give to the violence we do not like or support, while finding euphemisms for the violence we do like or support? This is the morally problematic approach that I take throughout the course, beginning with the 1793-1794 Reign of Terror in France and ending with major episodes of contemporary terrorism in both its state and group forms.

Instructor Email: richard.drake@umotana.edu

Making History Public | HSTA 275 01

Course Photo for Making History Public Instructor: Claire Arcenas
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: TR 12:30-1:50

Course Description: Public history is a wide-ranging, impactful and distinct field of history. In this class, we will explore the methods, theories and ethics that guide how public historians: Exhibit history in museums, engage the public with digital projects, provide historical context in public places, work with local communities, and use historical expertise in government and the courts. We will discuss current and past controversies in public history (such as Confederate monuments) and survey how the digital age has transformed aspects of public history. Together, we will work on a class project that will give students hands-on experience with a real public history project.

Instructor Email: claire.arcenas@umontana.edu

Early Christianity | HSTR 291 01

Course Photo for Early Christianity Instructor: Nathaniel Levtow
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Remote
Days and times: T/Th 11:00-12:20

Course Description: This course offers an introduction to the history, literature and religion of early Christianity, with a focus on the New Testament and the ancient world of its authors. The course introduces students to early Christian literature, history, religion; to the intellectual and social world of the first Christians; to the ancient Mediterranean; and to the study of religion and the Bible in the modern university. Topics include: early Christian contexts (ancient Judaism; Greek and Roman religion and philosophy); Gospels and the historical Jesus; the letters and theology of Paul; the Dead Sea Scrolls; archaeology; apocalypticism.

Instructor Email: nathaniel.levtow@umontana.edu

Terrorism: Honors Seminar | HSTR 291 80

Course Photo for Terrorism: Honors Seminar Instructor: Richard Drake
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MWF 11-11:50

Course Description: Students in the seminar will meet every Friday in the Davidson Honors College from 2:00 to 2:50 with Professor Drake. They will discuss the lectures, readings, and/or films for that week in HSTR 272E. Students will write one five-page review of a book about terrorism not on the required reading list for HSTR 272E. The review, which will be worth 50 percent of the semester grade, will be due in class in mid-April. The other 50 percent of the semester grade will be based on seminar participation. The goal of the course is to provide a stimulating intellectual seminar environment for highly motivated students in which they can acquire an understanding of the historical forces responsible for the scourge of terrorism in the modern world. The discussion materials for our weekly meetings will follow the HSTR 272E syllabus.

Instructor Email: richard.drake@umotana.edu

European Social and Intellectual History: The 20th Century | HSTR 325 01

Course Photo for European Social and Intellectual History: The 20th Century Instructor: Richard Drake
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: MWF 1:00-1:50

Course Description: The triumph of the Avant-Garde and the decline of traditional culture: 1914-1945.

Instructor Email: richard.drake@umotana.edu

Iran Between Two Revolutions | HSTR 368 01

Course Photo for Iran Between Two Revolutions Instructor: Mehrdad Kia
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: W 6:00-8:50

Course Description: After sketching the geographical, historical, and cultural background of ancient Persia, this course will examine, in greater detail and depth, the political, social, and intellectual history of Iran since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Special attention will be given to the rise of nationalism in the nineteenth century and the radicalization of the Shia religious hierarchy and the modernist intelligentsia as well as the reforms introduced by the two Pahlavi shahs from 1925 to 1979 and the political, social, and cultural causes of the 1979 revolution. The course ends with a discussion of Iran under the Islamic regime and the emergence of the country as a major political, economic, and military power challenging American and Russian hegemony in the Middle East and Central Asia.

Instructor Email: mehrdad.kia@mso.umt.edu

The Holocaust | HSTR 391 01

Course Photo for The Holocaust Instructor: Gillian Glaes
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: TR 11:00-12:20

Course Description: Fulfills the European requirement for History majors.

Instructor Email: gillian.glaes@umontana.edu

Prophecy and History | HSTR 391

Course Photo for Prophecy and History Instructor: Nathaniel Levtow
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: T/Th 2:00 pm –3:20 pm

Course Description: This course explores the phenomenon of prophecy, with special attention to the literature by and about prophets in biblical antiquity, to prophetic ideas of history, and to the social and political roles of prophets in ancient societies. We begin by asking what “prophecy” means to us today and what it may have meant to the ancients. We then survey biblical and other ancient prophets and prophecies in their literary, social, and historical contexts. Later in the semester, we explore the relationship between prophecy and apocalypticism. We conclude with a look at how ancient prophecy was received and transformed within western religious traditions. The approaches we take, and the questions we ask, will be informed by a variety of perspectives and disciplines including comparative religion, anthropology, history, literature and archaeology. This course assumes no prior background in the study of any religion.

Instructor Email: nathaniel.levtow@umontana.edu

Internship | HSTR 398 01

Course Photo for Internship Instructor: Anya Jabour
Credits: 1 to 6

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: To be arranged

Course Description: The professional study of history has--and should have--a robust life outside of the ivory tower, and we prepare our students to work in the broad field of public history. To that end, we encourage interested students to seek out internships in the field. The goal of an internship is to provide students with professional, hands-on experience making the past relevant and accessible to the wider public. A Public History Internship will help prepare students for a dynamic career in the twenty-first-century workforce. Students will gain professional contacts and foster relationships that will aid in finding employment after graduation.

Instructor Email: anya.jabour@umontana.edu

Additional Details: http://hs.umt.edu/history/courses/internships/default.php

Human Rights in Latin America | HSTR 435 01

Course Photo for Human Rights in Latin America Instructor: Jody Pavilack
Credits: 3

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face
Days and times: M, 2-4:50

Course Description: In the second half of the twentieth century, many Latin American countries experienced decades of civil war, dictatorship, and systematic state violence perpetrated against large segments of their populations. Tens of thousands of people were arrested, tortured, and killed, often without judicial proceedings. Toward the end of the century, most of these countries found themselves struggling to achieve or return to stable democracy. This required somehow dealing with the violence of the past—a process known as transitional justice. How would Cold War era battles be narrated and remembered? How would human rights violations be confronted and atoned for? How could truth, justice, and reconciliation be achieved? In this course, we read memoirs, court testimonies, and fictionalized accounts by victims, as well as scholarly and activist writings. We also watch many documentary films, and engage in vibrant class discussions.

Instructor Email: jody.pavilack@umontana.edu